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Coos County Oregon

Authors/Editors:  Dave Lauten, Russ Namitz, Chuck Gates
County Seat: Coquille
County Size: 1,806 square miles
High Elevation : Mount Bolivar (4,319 feet)
Rarities : Fulvous Whistling Duck, Steller's Eider, King Eider, Murphy's Petrel, Black-vented Shearwater, Brown Booby, Lesser Sand-Plover, Wilson's Plover, Piping Plover, Mt. Plover, Great Knot, Little Stint, White-rumped Sandpiper, Curlew Sandpiper, Red-legged Kittiwake, Eastern Phoebe, Sedge Wren, Yellow-throated Warbler, Prairie Warbler, Prothonotary Warbler, Chestnut-collared Longspur, Painted Bunting, Common Eider
Top County Lister : Tim Rodenkirk (345)
Year List Record : Tim Rodenkirk 2010 (272)
County Contact Person: email Tim Rodenkirk or email Russ Namitz

Checklists   Full checklists contain all birds seen in the county.  The brief checklists have all rarities removed and have a larger font to make them easier to use in the field.  To help us better understand bird distribution in the state, report any bird not on the checklists.  Of special interest are birds marked with  (C) or  (S)  on the full checklist.  You can contact the person listed above or report your sightings to birdnotes.net.

 

 

Coos County Oregon

Authors/Editors:  Dave Lauten, Russ Namitz, Chuck Gates
County Seat: Coquille
County Size: 1,806 square miles
High Elevation : Mount Bolivar (4,319 feet)
Rarities : Fulvous Whistling Duck, Steller's Eider, King Eider, Murphy's Petrel, Black-vented Shearwater, Brown Booby, Lesser Sand-Plover, Wilson's Plover, Piping Plover, Mt. Plover, Great Knot, Little Stint, White-rumped Sandpiper, Curlew Sandpiper, Red-legged Kittiwake, Eastern Phoebe, Sedge Wren, Yellow-throated Warbler, Prairie Warbler, Prothonotary Warbler, Chestnut-collared Longspur, Painted Bunting, Common Eider
Top County Lister : Tim Rodenkirk (345)
Year List Record : Tim Rodenkirk 2010 (272)
County Contact Person: email Tim Rodenkirk or email Russ Namitz

Checklists   Full checklists contain all birds seen in the county.  The brief checklists have all rarities removed and have a larger font to make them easier to use in the field.  To help us better understand bird distribution in the state, report any bird not on the checklists.  Of special interest are birds marked with  (C) or  (S)  on the full checklist.  You can contact the person listed above or report your sightings to birdnotes.net.

 

 

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Introduction: Coos County offers some of the best birding in Oregon year round.  With a county species list of 403 (third highest in the state), Coos offers a wide variety of species associated with upland and lowland habitats.  With its large bay and related marshes, rivers, pastures, and ponds, Coos County harbors significant numbers of breeding and migrant birds.  The county has recorded over 50 species of shorebirds including some of North America’s most spectacular vagrants (Great Knot, Bristle-thighed Curlew, Red-necked Stint, Little Stint), as well as numerous other rare species from boobies to longspurs.  Birding Coos at any time of the year is rewarding.  Summer features breeding seabirds and forest birds while winter offers opportunities like the Coos Bay Christmas Bird Count which regularly falls within the top 25-30 counts in the United States and Canada for species diversity.  Coos County also harbors the largest city on the Oregon coast (Coos Bay/North Bend) resulting in excellent infrastructure for the visiting birder.  An indispensible resource is the booklet "Birding the Southern Oregon Coast" produced by the Cape Arago Audubon Society.  This resource lists many more good birding areas and has wonderful maps of the whole coast from Yachats to the California border.  Another terrific resource is the "Birds of Coos County, Oregon" written by Allen Contreras.  This document gives an excellent physical description of the county, describes the bioregions of Coos County and gives detailed species accounts for the birds found within the county borders.  Using these two sources along with this site guide will greatly increase your birding experience in Coos County.  You can obtain a copy of both of these publications by going to the Oregon Birding Association's Bookstore web site.


Introduction: Coos County offers some of the best birding in Oregon year round.  With a county species list of 403 (third highest in the state), Coos offers a wide variety of species associated with upland and lowland habitats.  With its large bay and related marshes, rivers, pastures, and ponds, Coos County harbors significant numbers of breeding and migrant birds.  The county has recorded over 50 species of shorebirds including some of North America’s most spectacular vagrants (Great Knot, Bristle-thighed Curlew, Red-necked Stint, Little Stint), as well as numerous other rare species from boobies to longspurs.  Birding Coos at any time of the year is rewarding.  Summer features breeding seabirds and forest birds while winter offers opportunities like the Coos Bay Christmas Bird Count which regularly falls within the top 25-30 counts in the United States and Canada for species diversity.  Coos County also harbors the largest city on the Oregon coast (Coos Bay/North Bend) resulting in excellent infrastructure for the visiting birder.  An indispensible resource is the booklet "Birding the Southern Oregon Coast" produced by the Cape Arago Audubon Society.  This resource lists many more good birding areas and has wonderful maps of the whole coast from Yachats to the California border.  Another terrific resource is the "Birds of Coos County, Oregon" written by Allen Contreras.  This document gives an excellent physical description of the county, describes the bioregions of Coos County and gives detailed species accounts for the birds found within the county borders.  Using these two sources along with this site guide will greatly increase your birding experience in Coos County.  You can obtain a copy of both of these publications by going to the Oregon Birding Association's Bookstore web site.

Coos County Birding Locations

 

Birding Locations

 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 32 D-3  DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 44 E-5     geographic coordinates 43 34’ 32” N   124 10’ 30" W
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Location, Habitat and Birds: Lakeside is in Northern Coos County near the Douglas County border.  It is just east of Hwy 101 about 10 miles south of Reedsport and about 10 miles north of the Coos Bay bridge.  From Hwy 101 turn east on Airport Way and travel into Lakeside.  Turn right on 8th Street and follow it to the end.  Bird the mouth of 10 Mile Creek from this location.  Backtrack a block and go one block east on Park Avenue to 10 Mile Boat Ramp Park.  Bird the area around the parking lot and boat ramp.  Go north one block and travel east on North Lake Road until it ends at a trailer park.  Enter the park at Kings Row and take the first right to the lakeshore.  There is a good marshy area here that can be very birdy.  Return to Kings Row and travel east until the road turns to dirt.  Continue east into a forested area that opens into a marshy region.  Bird this area as time allows.  If you are adventurous, you can make the 2.5 mile hike along 10 mile Creek to the mouth and beach.  Oregon's first record for Dickcissel was found at Lakeside in 1979. A Great-tailed Crackle was here in 2005 and again in 2006. Starting back at 101 and Airport Way.  Just east of this intersection go south on Wildwood Drive.  This road goes under 101 and becomes Spinreel Road.  Take Spinreel south for 0.8 miles past the 101 bridge and turn right across from the dune buggy place.  Take an immediate left and follow this road to its end.  Park here. You can follow the creek to the ocean but there is no set trail.  On the south side of the parking lot a sand road begins where ORV use is permitted. You can walk or drive (four wheel drive only) up the road to the large open sand dune area, and continue west on the numerous small trails in the woods adjacent to 10 Mile Creek. There is no set path to take, but eventually the trails will lead west to the estuary at the mouth of 10 Mile Creek. Alternatively, you can walk or drive with four wheel drive on the blue marked Sand Road. The road leads southwest and ends at the ocean, about a mile or so south of 10 mile Creek estuary. There is no driving north on the beach, so you can park and walk north along the beach to the estuary. The estuary includes a large lagoon, marsh, and pond on the south side of the mouth of the creek. This area is very productive for shorebirds and waterfowl, both during migration and in summer and winter. The area is an important nesting area for Western Snowy Plover. Please observe all signs and roped nesting area. During the breeding season stay away from the nesting area to reduce disturbance to the nesting plovers.  This is an extremely reliable site for Snowy Plovers which can be found roosting in the wrackline year round. This site can attract rare species such as Red-necked Stint in 2009 and Buff-breasted Sandpiper. For an alternative way to access this area, see John Dellenback Dunes.  More information is needed about the birds in this area so please report you sightings if you bird the Lakeside region.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 32 D-4   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 44 E-5    geographic coordinates 43 35’ 02” N   124 11’ 07" W
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Location, Habitat, and Birds:   Go to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.   Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 104. There is an alternative way to access the estuary at the mouth of 10 Mile Creek. If you walk through the woods on the trail you will access the open dunes. Continue west on the open dunes and you will see the estuary and mouth of 10 mile Creek in the distance. Walk west to the edge of the deflation plain (the marshy, brushy area behind the fore-dune of the beach), and pick your way through the habitat, accessing the estuary and mouth of the river on the northeast side. This area is also Western Snowy Plover nesting habitat, so carefully observe all signs and ropes in the area if it is the breeding season. You can walk south along the east side of the estuary and lagoon to the creek, and if the tide and water levels are reasonable, you can wade across the creek to the south side. 
Golden & Silver Falls State Natural Area  return to the top
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 34 A-1    DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 45 F-7     geographic coordinates 43 29’ 02” N   123 55’ 52" W
Location, Habitat, and Birds:    Go to the Oregon Birding Trails Website. Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 107.
DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 33 A-7 DeLorme (copyright 2008) pg 51 A-10         geographic coordinates 43 26’ 37” N   124 13’ 19” W
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Location:    As you are driving south toward North Bend/Coos Bay, the McCullough bridge will come into view. Before you cross that bridge, turn right on the Trans Pacific road.   There are several wide areas along this road where you can pull over and scope the bay. Sometimes shorebirds and "rockpipers" can be seen taking shelter on the leeward side of the road. Continue on this road until you cross the water and bear right crossing the railroad tracks.    Bear left after crossing the railroad tracks and stay on the Trans Pacific road. Take the next left about ¼ mile or so down the road onto Jordan Cove road, and follow the road to the end before the pulp mill. You can scan Jordan Cove, which is a small bay that attracts good numbers of birds. Return to the Trans Pacific Road, go right, and then go left at the fork near the railroad tracks and follow the signs to Horsfall Beach State Park. The road to Horsfall Beach will take you to Bluebill Loop described below, and out to the beach. The beach here at Horsfall is easy to access, but also open to vehicle use to the north. One can scan the ocean from the fore-dune or bird the shrubby edge of the parking lot, but this parking area has much ORV activity, so it is not very quiet. You can hike the beach south to the end of the North Spit (this is about 10 miles one way). Alternatively, instead of going to Horsfall Beach, continue west on the Trans Pacific road and it will bend south. At the bend in the road are two parking lots, and the lower lot has several trails that meander through the shrubs. Further south along the road you will encounter a large marshy area to the west, with a diked and gated road on the south side. One can park along the road here, but do not block the gate. Go around the gate and onto the dike. This dike goes due west and is an access to the beach. This is old Weyerhauser property, but is regularly used by walkers and birders. On the north side of the dike is a fresh water marsh, good for typical marsh birds and shorebirds. On the south side is an old pond known as the aeration ponds. This pond is excellent for waterfowl, phalaropes and swallows. The dike goes all the way around the pond, and the willows lining the pond have had some excellent vagrant passerines through the years. The willows however are very large and difficult to see into. Further west and south of the dike is a large deflation plain that is also very famous for rare birds and large numbers of shorebirds, raptors, and waterfowl. However the area is slowly being overgrown by willows and has become less attractive to many shorebirds as the ponds have not been used. Look for shorebirds in any area that has standing water, especially at the west end of the dike. At the far south end this area is a rocky dike, and on the south side of the dike is a marshy area that harbors nesting waterfowl and Wilson’s Phalaropes, one of the only coastal nesting sites for this species. The area is very large and one can walk around this area for hours. Back at the road, continue south until you see the BLM boat ramp parking lot on the east side of the road. Pull in and scan the bay and check the edges of the parking lot. A Rock Wren was found along the east edge of the parking lot. Further south on the main road is the entrance to the fore-dune sand road. Do not attempt this road without four wheel drive, and with four wheel drive be prepared for soft sand. You will need a flag on your vehicle to drive this road, and a shovel and air gauge (for depressuring your tires) are recommended too. If you do not have a four wheel drive vehicle, you can walk this road and you will be on the south side of the large deflation plain area described above. Check the grassy pond on the south side of the road, which once had a Little Gull. This area to the north and south is also one of the rare coastal nesting areas of Ring-necked Duck, amongst other breeding waterfowl. Continue west on this road and you will reach the south end of the marshy area at the south end of the deflation area. This is the same area with nesting Wilson’s Phalaropes, but is also good for waterfowl including Cinnamon Teal. This area is famous for Oregon’s first record of Sedge Wren. In fall and winter any of these areas are good for rare tyrant flycatchers like Scissor-tailed and Tropical Kingbird, and Northern Shrikes can be found anywhere in this area in fall and winter. This area has had numerous rare birds throughout the years and is one of the most productive areas in all Coos County. Whether on foot or in a vehicle, after the ponds the fore-dune road bends south behind the fore-dune. You can access the beach via several access locations, or walk or drive south on the road. It is about 5-6 miles to the jetty, a very very long walk. The beach is closed to vehicles from March 15 to Sept 15 due to nesting Western Snowy Plovers. There is also a large closed nesting for the plovers at the south end of the spit. It is very important to observe all signs and ropes and closed plover nesting areas. The area is critical for plover nesting and monitoring and enforcement during the nesting season is strictly applied. Plovers can be observed at almost any season on the beach in the wrackline, particular from the north jetty to about 1.5 miles or so to the north. Winter is the more difficult time to observe the plovers as there is not a large wintering flock here, but some are always present, however they may not be on the beach. If you can drive to the north jetty it is well worth it. The north jetty of the Coos river is one of the most flat, high jetties. One can scan the harbor mouth from the base of the jetty. If the waves are not huge, you can walk out onto the jetty fairly far to get excellent views of the mouth of the river and the ocean beyond. "Rockpipers" are common on the jetty, as are gulls, cormorants, and pelicans. Harlequin Ducks may be off the tip of the jetty or along the rocky sides, and sometimes really good views of small alcids like Ancient Murrelet and Marbled Murrelet can be had. The jetty has had some famous visitors including a Steller’s Eider, King Eider and Red-legged Kittiwake. Back at the base of the jetty, the little cove beach to the east should be checked for waterfowl, shorebirds, and gulls.
If you did not take the fore-dune road, but stayed on the main road, just south of the entrance to the fore-dune road, on the west side, is a small grassy pond and marshy area. This is the same area as described above from the fore-dune road. This area once had a Little Gull. Continue south to the end of the road, where there is a turn around. Bird the fence around the old fish hatchery and the manufacturing facility just to the north. This fence area has had many good birds, such as Say’s Phoebe which seem to show up here regularly. Mountain Bluebird has been found here. Also bird the willows along the west side of the road. If one has four wheel drive, you can continue south on the sand road that leads through the woods. It will shortly come out along the edge of the bay. This is prime birding that does not get birded much. The Bay is subject to huge tides, so depending on the tide, there may be extensive or no mudflats. The best time to bird it is at mid-tide, when there is not too much mudflats but enough to attract birds. The area can teem with gulls, ducks, shorebirds, and herons and egrets. Huge flocks of migrant shorebirds can be along the bayside. Just keep driving south following the edge of the bay, stopping and scanning where you like, but do not drive out onto the mud, as it is very soft and your vehicle will get stuck. Stay on the dry sand along the edge of the upland. After you come out of the woods on a second small section along the bay, there is an island just offshore in the bay. This is Clam Island, and the area around the island and to the south of the island can be excellent for huge flocks of shorebirds or waterfowl if the tide is higher. If you get all the way to the south end, the sand road will veer inland, and you will be along the east edge of the Snowy Plover nesting area. This will be the fore-dune road again. If you travel south, you will shortly get to the north jetty area, and if you travel north the fore-dune road will lead you back in a big loop.   The area is large and remote, so if you do drive out on the spit, be prepared and never attempt any of this area with a two wheel drive!
Habitat and Birds: Birds that can be seen from Jordan Cove Road include Red-breasted Merganser, Surf Scoter, White-winged Scoter, Bufflehead, Common Loon, Pacific Loon, Red-throated Loon (Yellow is possible), grebes (Pied-billed, Horned, Eared, Western, Red-necked), Greater Yellowlegs, Marbled Godwit, Black Turnstone, Black-bellied Plover, gulls & terns, and Wrentit.  In 1992 a Steller's Eider was found at the North Spit and a Murphy's Petrel was found beached on Horsfall Beach in 1987.  A Red-necked Stint showed up here in 1999 and a Little Stint was here in 2002.  A Curlew Sandpiper was here in 2001 and a Little Gull was recorded in 1999.  A dead Xantus's Murrelet washed up here in 1998.  In 1997, both Tropical Kingbird and Scissor-tailed Flycatcher were found at this location.  A Sedge Wren and a Virginia Warbler were here in 2003.  A Cape May Warbler was here in 2004.  Two Chestnut-collared Longspurs were at this location in 2002 (another showed up in 2006).  A Great-tailed Grackle was discovered here in 2006 and Least Tern has been recorded twice at the south end of the spit. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 A-6   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 44 F-4     geographic coordinates 43 27’ 03” N   124 15’ 34" W
Location, Habitat, and Birds:   Go to the Oregon Birding Trails Website. Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 105.
DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 33 A-7 DeLorme (copyright 2008) pg 51 A-10 geographic coordinates 43 26’ 04” N   124 13’ 13” W
Location:    Traveling south on Hwy 101 just before crossing the McCullough bridge, turn east on East Bay Road.  Take this road for 2.6 miles to Kentuck Way Lane (some prefer to continue on East Bay Road which is a good option also).  This road follows Kentuck Slough and eventually ends about 6 miles into the Coast Range. 
Habitat and Birds: This area often floods and can be very good for herons, rails, shorebirds, and waders.  Once into the forest, look and listen for Mt. Quail, Sooty Grouse, Chestnut-backed Chickadee, and Brown Creeper.
DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 33 A-7 DeLorme (copyright 2008) pg 51 A-10         geographic coordinates 43 25’ 06” N   124 13’ 26” W
Location:    Just after passing over the McCullough bridge, turn left on Ferry Road.  The road will soon fork.  Take the right fork to the baseball diamond and bird that area.  Return to the fork and drive north for a short distance.  The road will curve around under Hwy 101 and will enter the Simpson Park Area.  Drive slowly and find pull-off places that will allow you to bird the area. 
Habitat and Birds: This area should be checked for migrant passerines.  It's good for wintering passerines as well (B&W Warbler has been seen here) and this is a good location for summer resident passerines.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 A-7  DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 A-10      geographic coordinates   43 24’ 23” N   124 13’ 27" W
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Location, Habitat and Birds:  North Bend is located on Hwy 101 22 miles south of Reedsport and 25 miles north of Bandon.  1) Simpson Park Island is to the west of Hwy 101, just south of the Coos Bay (Conde B. McCullough Memorial) Bridge.  Access is the first road (Ferry Rd.) south of the bridge on the east side.  Bear left at the first fork onto Chappel Pkwy.  Continue down the hill (past Pittum Loop) towards the water and follow the road under the bridge to a parking lot.  Walk the railroad tracks south to a junction and take a right along the tracks to head out to a not-so-obvious island created by dredge spoils.  Look for sparrow flocks along the way and, after the junction, look for ducks on both sides of the tracks.  2) Return to Ferry Rd. and turn left (east) to a dead end that the bay just after Ferry Park.  Scope the bay for waterbirds and listen for songbirds in the park itself.  3)  Heading south through North Bend, turn right (west) onto Virginia Ave.  Head west 0.9 miles and bear right onto Maple St.  After 0.2 miles, bear left onto Maple Ave which quickly turns into Colorado St.  Turn right after 0.2 miles at Airport Way and drive to the end where the road deadends at the Coos Bureau of Land Management (BLM) office.  This overlooks the airport where geese and plovers can often be found feeding.  Palm Warblers often winter in the bushes around the parking lot and a Black Phoebe is usually flycatching at the wastewater pond to the NW, viewable from above.  In the past, North Bend has produced such rarities as Eurasian Collared-Dove in 2006, Tropical Kingbird in 1982, Blue Jay in 1977, White Wagtail in 1999,  Black & White Warbler in 1978, Clay-colored Sparrow in 1983, Lark Bunting in 1980, and Dickcissel in 1988. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 33 A-7   DeLorme (copyright 2008) pg 51 A-9         geographic coordinates 43 24’ 26” N   124 13’ 54” W
Location:    Though the west side of the slough is now closed, there are several good viewing points that will allow the birder good views of the slough.  As you enter North Bend, look for signs that direct you to Ocean Beaches and Charleston.  Turn right on Virginia Street and travel west about 7 blocks.  On your left you will see the Pony Village Mall.  There are several businesses on your right that border the slough.  Pull into the parking lot closest to the slough channel that runs under Virginia Street and scope the slough (mid-tide is best).  To get a different view of the slough, backtrack east a block or so and take a left (north) on Monroe street.  Travel 4 blocks and turn left on Florida Street.  Park at the west end of Florida and walk down to the slough along the trail. 
Habitat and Birds: Shorebirds and waders are the primary attractions here though ducks, grebes, pelicans, and loons can be seen at higher tides.  Great Egret, Black-bellied Plover, Semipalmated Plover, Greater Yellowlegs, Whimbrel, Marbled Godwit, Red Knot, Sanderling, Western Sandpiper, Least Sandpiper, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Dunlin, and Short-billed Dowitcher can all be found here with some regularity.  Rarities to look for include both American and Pacific Golden-plover, Willet, Ruff, Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Baird's Sandpiper, Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, and Ruddy Turnstone.  Keep an eye out for fall Tropical Kingbirds and check the teal flocks for Eurasian Green-winged Teal.  A Stilt Sandpiper was here in 1982. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 a-7   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 A-10     geographic coordinates 43 21’ 59” N   124 13’ 04" W
Location, Habitat and Birds:  Coos Bay is on Hwy 101 about 21 miles north of Bandon and 26 miles south of Reedsport.  From Hwy 101 and Ivy Ave, park across from the Motel 6 on the bay side of the highway.  A small number of Willits winter here and scope the exposed mudflats for shorebirds and deeper channels for waterbirds.  2) South of Ivy Ave 0.7 miles, turn right (west) off Hwy 101 onto Commercial Ave.  Follow Commercial Ave (bear right after the light) until the stop sign at 10th St.  Turn right (north) onto 10th St. and park on the right at the softball field.  Walk across the street to Mingus Park and bird the pond.  Check the domestic waterfowl for wild birds such as scaup and wigeon.  Gulls are tame here and offer close study of good diversity in the winter.  A paved path leads into conifers at the NW corner of this small park where one can encounter woodland species.  A Green Heron has occassionally been seen in this corner of the pond. 3) Three blocks south of Mingus Park on 10th St., turn right (west) on Anderson Ave.  Continue west on Anderson Ave about 0.4 miles to a small parking area on the right where the road is bisected by powerlines.  There is a swamp on the left where Red-shouldered Hawks, Virginia Rails and Wood Ducks breed.  Rarities recorded around Coos Bay include Fulvous Whistling-Duck, King Eider, Yellow-billed Loon, Bristle-thighed Curlew, Bar-tailed Godwit, Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, Curlew Sandpiper, Stilt Sandpiper, Ruff, Elegant Tern, Long-billed Murrelet, Tropical Kingbird, and Hooded Oriole.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 B-7   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 A-10    geographic coordinates 43 21’ 58” N   124 11’ 43" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 106.  A Summer Tanager was here in 2001.  Indigo Bunting in 2001.  Swamp Sparrow, Harris's Sparrow and White-throated Sparrow can be found here on occasion as well. People often leave a little seed out in winter so look for these seed piles which will often have a good mix of sparrows.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 B-6   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 B-9  -     geographic coordinates 43 20’ 22” N   124 19’ 28" W
Location, Habitat and Birds: From North Bend, follow the signs to ocean beaches via Virginia Street.  At the intersection of  Virginia and Broadway St., turn left on Broadway.  Follow Broadway until it reaches a commercial area (McDonald's, Sizzler etc.).  Get in the right lane and turn right on Newmark Ave. (also called the Cape Arago Hwy).  Stay on this road for 1.8 miles and the road will take a 90 degree turn to the left.  Staying left here will take you to Charleston but a short detour straight ahead on Newark and down the hill to the docks can give you good views of resting birds (scoters, grebes, cormorants, gulls, ducks).  Continue back on the Cape Arago Hwy ( now marked Empire Blvd and this region is known by the locals as the community of Empire) and travel south.  At 0.6 miles south of the junction of Empire and Newmark, you will see the sewage treatment facility (Across from Fulton Ave.).  The facility itself offers no viewing but the parking area and the trail around the facility can be very productive.  Watch for Brant, Eurasian and American Wigeon, Marbled Godwit and Snowy Egrets here.  Back on the Cape Arago Hwy travel south for another 1.3 miles and look for a pull-off on the right (directly across from the dome-shaped house on Hedge Lane).  This area offers good scope views of bay and can produce shorebirds and gulls when the tide allows.  Proceed on the Cape Arago Hwy another .9 miles and park near a cement building about .1 miles past the Dairy Queen (this area is called Fossil Point).  Scope the bay.  Some species to watch for include Clark's Grebe, Brant, Harlequin Duck, and Eurasian Wigeon.  This is where a Brown Booby stayed in the winter of 09-10. Just north of the Dairy Queen, one can scan the sandy point behind the private house. You can walk north along the little side road adjacent to the Dairy Queen, and you will get a view of this sandy spit. This spit is a good place for Brant and large flocks of gulls and shorebirds. Bar-tailed Godwit has been found at this point several times.
Charleston Area & OIMB   return to the top
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 B-6   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 B-9  -     geographic coordinates 43 20’ 22” N   124 19’ 28" W
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Location, Habitat and Birds:  From North Bend, take the Cape Arago Hwy (see Empire & Barview for directions) for about 9 miles.  Cross the bridge into Charleston and take a right on Boat Basin Road.  Go west for a couple of blocks and turn right on Kingfisher Drive.  Take this to the water and make a loop around the marina area.  This is a decent place to get good looks at Brown Pelican (photos too), loons, grebes and other waterfowl. Return to Boat Basin Road via the loop around the marina.  Take a right and go a short distance to Alaska Packer Road.  This will give you a nice view of the bay and a nice sand spit that can hold gulls and shorebirds.  Return to Boat Basin Road and take it to its westerly end (Coast Guard housing).  From here, hike along the trail westward.  It will end at a fish-packing plant.  The area between the Coast Guard facility and the fish packing plant can be very birdy (This area is known as Coos Head).  Long-tailed Duck, grebes, loons, and pelicans are good here.  You might hear a Pileated Woodpecker in the woods as well.  A Magnificent Frigatebird was found here in 1987 and again in 1992.  One of Oregon's first Eurasian Collared-Doves was discovered here in 2006.  In 1984, a Northern Parula was found along the hiking trail and a Prothonotary Warbler was located in that vicinity in 1974.  Scissor-tailed Flycatcher in 2005, Vermillion Flycatcher in 1992, Summer Tanager in 1981, and Chestnut-sided Warbler in 1974 round out the rarities for this spot.    
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 B-8   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 52 - B-1    geographic coordinates 43 20’ 29” N   124 07’ 21" W
Location, Habitat and Birds: This route can be run in the daytime but the main draw here is the nighttime owling.  The best time to bird is late winter or early spring.  From the south end of Coos Bay, 101 takes a sweeping left turn and then turns south again.  Where the road turns south, go straight (east) on Newport Avenue.  This road becomes the Coos River Hwy (Hwy 241).  After the bridge, the road curves north for a while and it again curves east (this is the community of Eastside and the Millicoma Marsh).   Stay on 241 as it leaves Eastside.  Continue on until you cross the bridge at Catching Slough.  Just past the bridge, turn right on East Catching Slough Road.  Go 2.3 miles and turn left on Stock Slough Road.  Travel 2.2 miles and turn right on road #26-12-4.2.  This road is not signed but is paved for the first 4 miles.  Bird this whole paved section (there are dirt side roads to explore if you have a local map).  Listen for Saw-whet, Western Screech, N. Pygmy, and Great Horned Owls along this road.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 B-6   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 B-8     geographic coordinates 43 20’ 20” N   124 21’ 12" W
Location, Habitat and Birds: From Charleston, take the Cape Arago Hwy south for 1.5 miles and look for the turnoff to Bastendorf Beach.  Before you go down to the beach, explore the area near the entrance.  The pastures on the east side of the road can yield sparrows and Black Phoebe.  As you come to the beach, a creek empties into the ocean. This creek often has large flocks of gulls, and can have large shorebird flocks (although this beach is a popular dog beach, so birds tend not to stay here). A Curlew Sandpiper was found here on a Christmas Bird Count. Keep following the road, and take a left towards the south jetty. Park and scan the harbor from here, an excellent place to view waterfowl, loon, and grebes. A female King Eider was found here in spring. The south jetty is not a good jetty to walk out on as it is very uneven, slippery, and subject to large waves. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 B-6   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 B-8     geographic coordinates 43 19’ 49” N   124 22’ 19" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 109.  A Tropical Kingbird was here in 1983. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 B-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 B-8     geographic coordinates 43 18’ 59” N   124 23’ 05" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 110.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 B-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 B-8     geographic coordinates 43 18’ 18” N   124 23’ 38" W
Location, Habitat, and Birds   Go to the Oregon Birding Trails Website. Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 111.  A dead Brown Booby was found here on 26 October, 2008.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   33 B-6    DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 B-8     geographic coordinates 43 17’ 15” N   124 20’ 03" W
Location, Habitat, and Birds: Go to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.   Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 112.  A Hooded Warbler was found here in 1991.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 C-8     geographic coordinates   43 ’ ” N   124 ’ " W
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Location, Habitat and Birds: Travel about 14 miles south of Coos Bay and turn right on W. Beaver Hill Road.  Go 1.7 miles and turn left on E. Humphries Road (this road is also called Randolph Trail Road and Whiskey Run Road).  After 2.5 miles, turn right on 7 Devils Road and go 2 miles to the park.  A dead Short-tailed Albatross was found here in 2005 and a Curlew Sandpiper was here in 1976. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-8     geographic coordinates 43 11’ 17” N   124 23’ 23" W
Location, Habitat, and Birds   Go to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 113.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-8     geographic coordinates 43 09’ 13” N   124 24’ 24" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website. Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 116.  A Yellow-billed Loon was seen here in 1989 and a Wilson's Plover spent a week here in 1998.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-8     geographic coordinates 43 09’ 27” N   124 22’ 49" W
Location, Habitat, and Birds: Go to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.   Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 114.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-8     geographic coordinates 43 07’ 51” N   124 24’ 05" W
City Information at Bandon Information.
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 117.  A Curlew Sandpiper was here in 2000.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-8     geographic coordinates 43 09’ 27” N   124 22’ 49" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 115.  Stilt Sandpiper and Bar-tailed Godwit have been found here.  
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 D-7  DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 E-10     geographic coordinates   43 03’ 53” N   124 08’ 20" W
Location, Habitat and Birds: A Broad-winged Hawk was located here in 2007 and a Vermillion Flycatcher was here in 1992. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-7   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-10     geographic coordinates   43 10’ 37” N   124 11’ 15" W
Location, Habitat and Birds:  A Ruff was found here in 1980 and a Tufted Duck was here in 1984. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 D-5    DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-8     geographic coordinates   43 07’ 08” N   124 24’ 30" W
Check out the Birding Bandon website by Steve and Susan Dimock. They run the La Kris Inn in Bandon which is a great place to stay and they are local birders and bird photographers.
Location, Habitat and BirdsOnce in Bandon, take Filmore street north to the boat basin. Look for resting shorebirds and waders at the corner of Filmore and 1st Street (near the sewer facility). Stilt Sandpiper has been recorded here. This area is also good for gulls. Drive along the marina area checking for gulls, loons, pelicans and the like. At the end of 1st Street, park in front of the old Coast Guard facility. Walk around the back and check the old dock behind the building. This is a favorite roost of "rockpipers" at high tide. Look for both Black and Ruddy Turnstones here, and in winter Rock Sandpiper. From the end of 1st Street, take South Jetty Road out to the Jetty. About a mile down this road is a sandy area with rocks and pilings. This is good at high tide for things like godwits, Willet, and Whimbrel. Just west of the first pull out is a small pond that harbors various waterfowl. A small flock of domestic geese live here, and an Emperor Goose once wintered with this group. Drive out to the end of the road and check the river mouth for water birds, and the parking lot near the jetty often has a large flock of gulls. Coming out South Jetty road, make a right and go up the hill into the neighborhood. At the top of the hill, if you go left and travel about a block or so, there is a little low spot on the south side of the road with many deciduous trees. Pish this area, as it is good for passerines. If you go right from the top of the hill, you will head west towards the bluffs overlooking the mouth of the Coquille River. The road will bend south and become Beach Loop Road. After the bend in the road, turn right onto the small side street between the motel and the large house on the north. At the end of the road is a parking area that is excellent to scan the ocean and offshore rocks. Back on Beach Loop road, go right towards Coquille Point described below. Unusual birds found in or around Bandon include King Eider in 1992, Black-vented Shearwater in 1992, Gyrfalcon in 1998, Lesser Sand-Plover in 1986, Mountain Plover in 1989, Bristle-thighed Curlew in 1981 & 1998, Hudsonian Godwit in 1978 & 1985, Bar-tailed Godwit in 1976 -77-80-87-88-90-97-99, Oregon's only Great Knot in 1990, Red-necked Stint in 1984, Little Stint in 1986, Curlew Sandpiper in 1985, Stilt Sandpiper in 1984, Ruff in 1980-89-91, White-winged Dove in 2007, Tropical Kingbird in 1979-97, Prairie Warbler in 1989, Clay-colored Sparrow in 1985, and Lark Bunting in 2002.   For other adventures around Bandon, check out the site guides for Coquille River/South Jetty, Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge/Ni-les’tun Unit, Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge/Riverside Drive, Coquille River Valley, Coquille Point, and Face Rock Wayside.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-8     geographic coordinates 43 07’ 20” N   124 25’ 40" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 118.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-8     geographic coordinates 43 06’ 50” N   124 26’ 12" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 119.   From downtown Bandon, take Hwy 101 south.  Turn right on 11th Street.  Take this street to its end (it goes around some baseball diamonds but just stay the course) and park in the parking area.  Access the beach and check out the rocks for Harlequin Duck, Rock Sandpiper, and Tufted Puffin.  Gulls, Cormorants, alcids, and gulls can be scoped from here as well.  Chestnut-sided Warbler was found in this area in 1974. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-7     geographic coordinates 43 06’ 28” N   124 25’ 59" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 120.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-7     geographic coordinates 43 04’ 21” N   124 26’ 06" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGoing south on Beach Loop Road, continue south past Seabird Lane, and then past the parking lot for Devil's Kitchen, Bandon State Natural Area.  About 1/4-1/2 mile further south, there will be a pond on the
east side of Beach Loop Road.  You can park along the road or in the picnic area parking lot on the west side of the road.  Bird the edge of the pond and the cattail marsh at the south end of the pond.  This pond often has some common dabbler ducks, Hooded Mergansers, Pied-billed Grebe, and rails in the cattails.  Passerines and swallows are common around the edge and over the pond.  A Nashville Warbler was found here on a Christmas Bird Count.  Near the south end of the pond, on the west
side of the road, is the last access to Bandon State Natural Area, called China Creek.  Drive into this area and the parking lot will be on a small bluff above the beach.  China Creek empties into the ocean just below the parking lot, creating a meandering stream bed on the beach and in the summer often a pool or pond.  This area is very good for shorebirds.  In the spring, during late April and early May, this parking lot and beach area are excellent places to watch huge flocks of
migrating shorebirds flying north and often pausing at the mouth of the creek on the beach to feed.  As many as well over 100,000 shorebirds have been counted passing this location on a single day or morning.  This area is also good for odd shorebirds including Ruff, Long-billed Curlew, Willet, and Red Knot, as well as Whimbrels which are often common here.  A Least Tern was once found at this location.  Importantly however, this is the most easily accessible location in Coos County for Snowy Plovers.  The plovers are residents at this beach and can be found on any day at any time of the year.  The plovers nest from just below the parking lot south for many miles.  They generally roost around the China Creek area and up to a mile or more south of the parking lot.  During the non-breeding season, you will need to cross the creek (often shallow but in winter boots or no shoes may be necessary).  Walk south along the beach watching the wrackline carefully, as the plovers will roost in small to large flocks amongst the tidal debris or in depressions left in the sand.  If you do not see plovers within a 1/4 mile of the parking lot, keep walking south.  About 1.5 miles south there is a large habitat restoration area for nesting plovers, and often the plovers will be around this area or actually on the restoration area.  During the breeding season the entire beach south of China Creek is plover nesting habitat and is signed, roped and monitored.  Please stay away from the nesting area, as nests can be anywhere on the beach.  Plover beach restrictions are seriously enforced at this location, and all birders must pay attention to the signs, ropes, and monitors who watch and work on the beach.  DO NOT DISTURB the plovers!  During the non-breeding season the beach is open including the habitat restoration area, so you are permitted to walk on any area, but again, please do not overly harass or disturb the plovers, which are a protected species.  Also, this beach has very strict dog regulations, so it is best to leave your dog at home or in the car, as this is not a dog beach and more severe dog restrictions are being implemented over time.  If you have a lot of time and energy, you can walk the entire 2 miles south to the mouth of New River.  On the south side of the mouth of New River, there is a very large open sandy spit.  This is also prime plover nesting area.  Again, please be aware of all signs and ropes in the area, as during the breeding season this area is generally closed off to the public.  However, you are permitted to walk the beach and the river side.  The river side has enormous sand flats that attract many thousands of shorebirds in spring and fall.  Just downriver from the mouth is where Oregon's first documented White-rumped Sandpiper was found, and this area has had many other very interesting shorebirds just as Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, as well as many waterfowl and various other species.  This area is very remote and difficult to access, and takes many hours to walk.  To the north of China Creek are many rocky outcrops in the water and along the beach, and you should easily find Black Oystercatcher and "rockpipers" in the area.
Bradley Lake  return to the top
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 D-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 E-8     geographic coordinates 43 03’ 59” N   124 25’ 45" W
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Location, Habitat and Birds: Go south of Bandon about 3.5 miles and turn right on Bradley Lake Lane.  This lake is good for ducks and herons.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 25 A-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 F-7     geographic coordinates   42 59’ 47” N   124 27’ 22" W
Location, Habitat and Birds:   Travel south of Bandon on Hwy 101 for about 8 miles.  About 200 ft. past Milepost 283, turn west on Croft Road.  Go about 1.6 miles where the road will turn sharply to the left and the pavement ends.  Just before the curve, go straight on a dirt road.  Take this road for 0.4 miles to the host site (sometimes this location is closed to motor vehicles so be prepared to walk from here).  From the host site, go left and continue to a "T" in the road.  Turn right and you will shortly find a parking area and a trail to the river.  The river mouth is about 2 miles from here but there will be good birding all along the way.  Common birds you might see here include ducks, grebes, osprey, Peregrine Falcon, shorebirds, Anna's Hummingbird, Pacific-slope Flycatcher, Hutton's Vireo, Violet-green Swallow, Chestnut-backed Chickadee, Bewick's Wren, Wrentit, and Golden-crowned Sparrow.  There was a Bristle-thighed Curlew here in 1998. 
 
 

 

Birding Locations

 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 32 D-3  DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 44 E-5     geographic coordinates 43 34’ 32” N   124 10’ 30" W
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Location, Habitat and Birds: Lakeside is in Northern Coos County near the Douglas County border.  It is just east of Hwy 101 about 10 miles south of Reedsport and about 10 miles north of the Coos Bay bridge.  From Hwy 101 turn east on Airport Way and travel into Lakeside.  Turn right on 8th Street and follow it to the end.  Bird the mouth of 10 Mile Creek from this location.  Backtrack a block and go one block east on Park Avenue to 10 Mile Boat Ramp Park.  Bird the area around the parking lot and boat ramp.  Go north one block and travel east on North Lake Road until it ends at a trailer park.  Enter the park at Kings Row and take the first right to the lakeshore.  There is a good marshy area here that can be very birdy.  Return to Kings Row and travel east until the road turns to dirt.  Continue east into a forested area that opens into a marshy region.  Bird this area as time allows.  If you are adventurous, you can make the 2.5 mile hike along 10 mile Creek to the mouth and beach.  Oregon's first record for Dickcissel was found at Lakeside in 1979. A Great-tailed Crackle was here in 2005 and again in 2006. Starting back at 101 and Airport Way.  Just east of this intersection go south on Wildwood Drive.  This road goes under 101 and becomes Spinreel Road.  Take Spinreel south for 0.8 miles past the 101 bridge and turn right across from the dune buggy place.  Take an immediate left and follow this road to its end.  Park here. You can follow the creek to the ocean but there is no set trail.  On the south side of the parking lot a sand road begins where ORV use is permitted. You can walk or drive (four wheel drive only) up the road to the large open sand dune area, and continue west on the numerous small trails in the woods adjacent to 10 Mile Creek. There is no set path to take, but eventually the trails will lead west to the estuary at the mouth of 10 Mile Creek. Alternatively, you can walk or drive with four wheel drive on the blue marked Sand Road. The road leads southwest and ends at the ocean, about a mile or so south of 10 mile Creek estuary. There is no driving north on the beach, so you can park and walk north along the beach to the estuary. The estuary includes a large lagoon, marsh, and pond on the south side of the mouth of the creek. This area is very productive for shorebirds and waterfowl, both during migration and in summer and winter. The area is an important nesting area for Western Snowy Plover. Please observe all signs and roped nesting area. During the breeding season stay away from the nesting area to reduce disturbance to the nesting plovers.  This is an extremely reliable site for Snowy Plovers which can be found roosting in the wrackline year round. This site can attract rare species such as Red-necked Stint in 2009 and Buff-breasted Sandpiper. For an alternative way to access this area, see John Dellenback Dunes.  More information is needed about the birds in this area so please report you sightings if you bird the Lakeside region.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 32 D-4   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 44 E-5    geographic coordinates 43 35’ 02” N   124 11’ 07" W
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Location, Habitat, and Birds:   Go to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.   Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 104. There is an alternative way to access the estuary at the mouth of 10 Mile Creek. If you walk through the woods on the trail you will access the open dunes. Continue west on the open dunes and you will see the estuary and mouth of 10 mile Creek in the distance. Walk west to the edge of the deflation plain (the marshy, brushy area behind the fore-dune of the beach), and pick your way through the habitat, accessing the estuary and mouth of the river on the northeast side. This area is also Western Snowy Plover nesting habitat, so carefully observe all signs and ropes in the area if it is the breeding season. You can walk south along the east side of the estuary and lagoon to the creek, and if the tide and water levels are reasonable, you can wade across the creek to the south side. 
Golden & Silver Falls State Natural Area  return to the top
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 34 A-1    DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 45 F-7     geographic coordinates 43 29’ 02” N   123 55’ 52" W
Location, Habitat, and Birds:    Go to the Oregon Birding Trails Website. Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 107.
DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 33 A-7 DeLorme (copyright 2008) pg 51 A-10         geographic coordinates 43 26’ 37” N   124 13’ 19” W
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Location:    As you are driving south toward North Bend/Coos Bay, the McCullough bridge will come into view. Before you cross that bridge, turn right on the Trans Pacific road.   There are several wide areas along this road where you can pull over and scope the bay. Sometimes shorebirds and "rockpipers" can be seen taking shelter on the leeward side of the road. Continue on this road until you cross the water and bear right crossing the railroad tracks.    Bear left after crossing the railroad tracks and stay on the Trans Pacific road. Take the next left about ¼ mile or so down the road onto Jordan Cove road, and follow the road to the end before the pulp mill. You can scan Jordan Cove, which is a small bay that attracts good numbers of birds. Return to the Trans Pacific Road, go right, and then go left at the fork near the railroad tracks and follow the signs to Horsfall Beach State Park. The road to Horsfall Beach will take you to Bluebill Loop described below, and out to the beach. The beach here at Horsfall is easy to access, but also open to vehicle use to the north. One can scan the ocean from the fore-dune or bird the shrubby edge of the parking lot, but this parking area has much ORV activity, so it is not very quiet. You can hike the beach south to the end of the North Spit (this is about 10 miles one way). Alternatively, instead of going to Horsfall Beach, continue west on the Trans Pacific road and it will bend south. At the bend in the road are two parking lots, and the lower lot has several trails that meander through the shrubs. Further south along the road you will encounter a large marshy area to the west, with a diked and gated road on the south side. One can park along the road here, but do not block the gate. Go around the gate and onto the dike. This dike goes due west and is an access to the beach. This is old Weyerhauser property, but is regularly used by walkers and birders. On the north side of the dike is a fresh water marsh, good for typical marsh birds and shorebirds. On the south side is an old pond known as the aeration ponds. This pond is excellent for waterfowl, phalaropes and swallows. The dike goes all the way around the pond, and the willows lining the pond have had some excellent vagrant passerines through the years. The willows however are very large and difficult to see into. Further west and south of the dike is a large deflation plain that is also very famous for rare birds and large numbers of shorebirds, raptors, and waterfowl. However the area is slowly being overgrown by willows and has become less attractive to many shorebirds as the ponds have not been used. Look for shorebirds in any area that has standing water, especially at the west end of the dike. At the far south end this area is a rocky dike, and on the south side of the dike is a marshy area that harbors nesting waterfowl and Wilson’s Phalaropes, one of the only coastal nesting sites for this species. The area is very large and one can walk around this area for hours. Back at the road, continue south until you see the BLM boat ramp parking lot on the east side of the road. Pull in and scan the bay and check the edges of the parking lot. A Rock Wren was found along the east edge of the parking lot. Further south on the main road is the entrance to the fore-dune sand road. Do not attempt this road without four wheel drive, and with four wheel drive be prepared for soft sand. You will need a flag on your vehicle to drive this road, and a shovel and air gauge (for depressuring your tires) are recommended too. If you do not have a four wheel drive vehicle, you can walk this road and you will be on the south side of the large deflation plain area described above. Check the grassy pond on the south side of the road, which once had a Little Gull. This area to the north and south is also one of the rare coastal nesting areas of Ring-necked Duck, amongst other breeding waterfowl. Continue west on this road and you will reach the south end of the marshy area at the south end of the deflation area. This is the same area with nesting Wilson’s Phalaropes, but is also good for waterfowl including Cinnamon Teal. This area is famous for Oregon’s first record of Sedge Wren. In fall and winter any of these areas are good for rare tyrant flycatchers like Scissor-tailed and Tropical Kingbird, and Northern Shrikes can be found anywhere in this area in fall and winter. This area has had numerous rare birds throughout the years and is one of the most productive areas in all Coos County. Whether on foot or in a vehicle, after the ponds the fore-dune road bends south behind the fore-dune. You can access the beach via several access locations, or walk or drive south on the road. It is about 5-6 miles to the jetty, a very very long walk. The beach is closed to vehicles from March 15 to Sept 15 due to nesting Western Snowy Plovers. There is also a large closed nesting for the plovers at the south end of the spit. It is very important to observe all signs and ropes and closed plover nesting areas. The area is critical for plover nesting and monitoring and enforcement during the nesting season is strictly applied. Plovers can be observed at almost any season on the beach in the wrackline, particular from the north jetty to about 1.5 miles or so to the north. Winter is the more difficult time to observe the plovers as there is not a large wintering flock here, but some are always present, however they may not be on the beach. If you can drive to the north jetty it is well worth it. The north jetty of the Coos river is one of the most flat, high jetties. One can scan the harbor mouth from the base of the jetty. If the waves are not huge, you can walk out onto the jetty fairly far to get excellent views of the mouth of the river and the ocean beyond. "Rockpipers" are common on the jetty, as are gulls, cormorants, and pelicans. Harlequin Ducks may be off the tip of the jetty or along the rocky sides, and sometimes really good views of small alcids like Ancient Murrelet and Marbled Murrelet can be had. The jetty has had some famous visitors including a Steller’s Eider, King Eider and Red-legged Kittiwake. Back at the base of the jetty, the little cove beach to the east should be checked for waterfowl, shorebirds, and gulls.
If you did not take the fore-dune road, but stayed on the main road, just south of the entrance to the fore-dune road, on the west side, is a small grassy pond and marshy area. This is the same area as described above from the fore-dune road. This area once had a Little Gull. Continue south to the end of the road, where there is a turn around. Bird the fence around the old fish hatchery and the manufacturing facility just to the north. This fence area has had many good birds, such as Say’s Phoebe which seem to show up here regularly. Mountain Bluebird has been found here. Also bird the willows along the west side of the road. If one has four wheel drive, you can continue south on the sand road that leads through the woods. It will shortly come out along the edge of the bay. This is prime birding that does not get birded much. The Bay is subject to huge tides, so depending on the tide, there may be extensive or no mudflats. The best time to bird it is at mid-tide, when there is not too much mudflats but enough to attract birds. The area can teem with gulls, ducks, shorebirds, and herons and egrets. Huge flocks of migrant shorebirds can be along the bayside. Just keep driving south following the edge of the bay, stopping and scanning where you like, but do not drive out onto the mud, as it is very soft and your vehicle will get stuck. Stay on the dry sand along the edge of the upland. After you come out of the woods on a second small section along the bay, there is an island just offshore in the bay. This is Clam Island, and the area around the island and to the south of the island can be excellent for huge flocks of shorebirds or waterfowl if the tide is higher. If you get all the way to the south end, the sand road will veer inland, and you will be along the east edge of the Snowy Plover nesting area. This will be the fore-dune road again. If you travel south, you will shortly get to the north jetty area, and if you travel north the fore-dune road will lead you back in a big loop.   The area is large and remote, so if you do drive out on the spit, be prepared and never attempt any of this area with a two wheel drive!
Habitat and Birds: Birds that can be seen from Jordan Cove Road include Red-breasted Merganser, Surf Scoter, White-winged Scoter, Bufflehead, Common Loon, Pacific Loon, Red-throated Loon (Yellow is possible), grebes (Pied-billed, Horned, Eared, Western, Red-necked), Greater Yellowlegs, Marbled Godwit, Black Turnstone, Black-bellied Plover, gulls & terns, and Wrentit.  In 1992 a Steller's Eider was found at the North Spit and a Murphy's Petrel was found beached on Horsfall Beach in 1987.  A Red-necked Stint showed up here in 1999 and a Little Stint was here in 2002.  A Curlew Sandpiper was here in 2001 and a Little Gull was recorded in 1999.  A dead Xantus's Murrelet washed up here in 1998.  In 1997, both Tropical Kingbird and Scissor-tailed Flycatcher were found at this location.  A Sedge Wren and a Virginia Warbler were here in 2003.  A Cape May Warbler was here in 2004.  Two Chestnut-collared Longspurs were at this location in 2002 (another showed up in 2006).  A Great-tailed Grackle was discovered here in 2006 and Least Tern has been recorded twice at the south end of the spit. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 A-6   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 44 F-4     geographic coordinates 43 27’ 03” N   124 15’ 34" W
Location, Habitat, and Birds:   Go to the Oregon Birding Trails Website. Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 105.
DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 33 A-7 DeLorme (copyright 2008) pg 51 A-10 geographic coordinates 43 26’ 04” N   124 13’ 13” W
Location:    Traveling south on Hwy 101 just before crossing the McCullough bridge, turn east on East Bay Road.  Take this road for 2.6 miles to Kentuck Way Lane (some prefer to continue on East Bay Road which is a good option also).  This road follows Kentuck Slough and eventually ends about 6 miles into the Coast Range. 
Habitat and Birds: This area often floods and can be very good for herons, rails, shorebirds, and waders.  Once into the forest, look and listen for Mt. Quail, Sooty Grouse, Chestnut-backed Chickadee, and Brown Creeper.
DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 33 A-7 DeLorme (copyright 2008) pg 51 A-10         geographic coordinates 43 25’ 06” N   124 13’ 26” W
Location:    Just after passing over the McCullough bridge, turn left on Ferry Road.  The road will soon fork.  Take the right fork to the baseball diamond and bird that area.  Return to the fork and drive north for a short distance.  The road will curve around under Hwy 101 and will enter the Simpson Park Area.  Drive slowly and find pull-off places that will allow you to bird the area. 
Habitat and Birds: This area should be checked for migrant passerines.  It's good for wintering passerines as well (B&W Warbler has been seen here) and this is a good location for summer resident passerines.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 A-7  DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 A-10      geographic coordinates   43 24’ 23” N   124 13’ 27" W
View A Google Map                 
Location, Habitat and Birds:  North Bend is located on Hwy 101 22 miles south of Reedsport and 25 miles north of Bandon.  1) Simpson Park Island is to the west of Hwy 101, just south of the Coos Bay (Conde B. McCullough Memorial) Bridge.  Access is the first road (Ferry Rd.) south of the bridge on the east side.  Bear left at the first fork onto Chappel Pkwy.  Continue down the hill (past Pittum Loop) towards the water and follow the road under the bridge to a parking lot.  Walk the railroad tracks south to a junction and take a right along the tracks to head out to a not-so-obvious island created by dredge spoils.  Look for sparrow flocks along the way and, after the junction, look for ducks on both sides of the tracks.  2) Return to Ferry Rd. and turn left (east) to a dead end that the bay just after Ferry Park.  Scope the bay for waterbirds and listen for songbirds in the park itself.  3)  Heading south through North Bend, turn right (west) onto Virginia Ave.  Head west 0.9 miles and bear right onto Maple St.  After 0.2 miles, bear left onto Maple Ave which quickly turns into Colorado St.  Turn right after 0.2 miles at Airport Way and drive to the end where the road deadends at the Coos Bureau of Land Management (BLM) office.  This overlooks the airport where geese and plovers can often be found feeding.  Palm Warblers often winter in the bushes around the parking lot and a Black Phoebe is usually flycatching at the wastewater pond to the NW, viewable from above.  In the past, North Bend has produced such rarities as Eurasian Collared-Dove in 2006, Tropical Kingbird in 1982, Blue Jay in 1977, White Wagtail in 1999,  Black & White Warbler in 1978, Clay-colored Sparrow in 1983, Lark Bunting in 1980, and Dickcissel in 1988. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 33 A-7   DeLorme (copyright 2008) pg 51 A-9         geographic coordinates 43 24’ 26” N   124 13’ 54” W
Location:    Though the west side of the slough is now closed, there are several good viewing points that will allow the birder good views of the slough.  As you enter North Bend, look for signs that direct you to Ocean Beaches and Charleston.  Turn right on Virginia Street and travel west about 7 blocks.  On your left you will see the Pony Village Mall.  There are several businesses on your right that border the slough.  Pull into the parking lot closest to the slough channel that runs under Virginia Street and scope the slough (mid-tide is best).  To get a different view of the slough, backtrack east a block or so and take a left (north) on Monroe street.  Travel 4 blocks and turn left on Florida Street.  Park at the west end of Florida and walk down to the slough along the trail. 
Habitat and Birds: Shorebirds and waders are the primary attractions here though ducks, grebes, pelicans, and loons can be seen at higher tides.  Great Egret, Black-bellied Plover, Semipalmated Plover, Greater Yellowlegs, Whimbrel, Marbled Godwit, Red Knot, Sanderling, Western Sandpiper, Least Sandpiper, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Dunlin, and Short-billed Dowitcher can all be found here with some regularity.  Rarities to look for include both American and Pacific Golden-plover, Willet, Ruff, Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Baird's Sandpiper, Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, and Ruddy Turnstone.  Keep an eye out for fall Tropical Kingbirds and check the teal flocks for Eurasian Green-winged Teal.  A Stilt Sandpiper was here in 1982. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 a-7   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 A-10     geographic coordinates 43 21’ 59” N   124 13’ 04" W
Location, Habitat and Birds:  Coos Bay is on Hwy 101 about 21 miles north of Bandon and 26 miles south of Reedsport.  From Hwy 101 and Ivy Ave, park across from the Motel 6 on the bay side of the highway.  A small number of Willits winter here and scope the exposed mudflats for shorebirds and deeper channels for waterbirds.  2) South of Ivy Ave 0.7 miles, turn right (west) off Hwy 101 onto Commercial Ave.  Follow Commercial Ave (bear right after the light) until the stop sign at 10th St.  Turn right (north) onto 10th St. and park on the right at the softball field.  Walk across the street to Mingus Park and bird the pond.  Check the domestic waterfowl for wild birds such as scaup and wigeon.  Gulls are tame here and offer close study of good diversity in the winter.  A paved path leads into conifers at the NW corner of this small park where one can encounter woodland species.  A Green Heron has occassionally been seen in this corner of the pond. 3) Three blocks south of Mingus Park on 10th St., turn right (west) on Anderson Ave.  Continue west on Anderson Ave about 0.4 miles to a small parking area on the right where the road is bisected by powerlines.  There is a swamp on the left where Red-shouldered Hawks, Virginia Rails and Wood Ducks breed.  Rarities recorded around Coos Bay include Fulvous Whistling-Duck, King Eider, Yellow-billed Loon, Bristle-thighed Curlew, Bar-tailed Godwit, Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, Curlew Sandpiper, Stilt Sandpiper, Ruff, Elegant Tern, Long-billed Murrelet, Tropical Kingbird, and Hooded Oriole.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 B-7   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 A-10    geographic coordinates 43 21’ 58” N   124 11’ 43" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 106.  A Summer Tanager was here in 2001.  Indigo Bunting in 2001.  Swamp Sparrow, Harris's Sparrow and White-throated Sparrow can be found here on occasion as well. People often leave a little seed out in winter so look for these seed piles which will often have a good mix of sparrows.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 B-6   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 B-9  -     geographic coordinates 43 20’ 22” N   124 19’ 28" W
Location, Habitat and Birds: From North Bend, follow the signs to ocean beaches via Virginia Street.  At the intersection of  Virginia and Broadway St., turn left on Broadway.  Follow Broadway until it reaches a commercial area (McDonald's, Sizzler etc.).  Get in the right lane and turn right on Newmark Ave. (also called the Cape Arago Hwy).  Stay on this road for 1.8 miles and the road will take a 90 degree turn to the left.  Staying left here will take you to Charleston but a short detour straight ahead on Newark and down the hill to the docks can give you good views of resting birds (scoters, grebes, cormorants, gulls, ducks).  Continue back on the Cape Arago Hwy ( now marked Empire Blvd and this region is known by the locals as the community of Empire) and travel south.  At 0.6 miles south of the junction of Empire and Newmark, you will see the sewage treatment facility (Across from Fulton Ave.).  The facility itself offers no viewing but the parking area and the trail around the facility can be very productive.  Watch for Brant, Eurasian and American Wigeon, Marbled Godwit and Snowy Egrets here.  Back on the Cape Arago Hwy travel south for another 1.3 miles and look for a pull-off on the right (directly across from the dome-shaped house on Hedge Lane).  This area offers good scope views of bay and can produce shorebirds and gulls when the tide allows.  Proceed on the Cape Arago Hwy another .9 miles and park near a cement building about .1 miles past the Dairy Queen (this area is called Fossil Point).  Scope the bay.  Some species to watch for include Clark's Grebe, Brant, Harlequin Duck, and Eurasian Wigeon.  This is where a Brown Booby stayed in the winter of 09-10. Just north of the Dairy Queen, one can scan the sandy point behind the private house. You can walk north along the little side road adjacent to the Dairy Queen, and you will get a view of this sandy spit. This spit is a good place for Brant and large flocks of gulls and shorebirds. Bar-tailed Godwit has been found at this point several times.
Charleston Area & OIMB   return to the top
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 B-6   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 B-9  -     geographic coordinates 43 20’ 22” N   124 19’ 28" W
View A Google Map         
Location, Habitat and Birds:  From North Bend, take the Cape Arago Hwy (see Empire & Barview for directions) for about 9 miles.  Cross the bridge into Charleston and take a right on Boat Basin Road.  Go west for a couple of blocks and turn right on Kingfisher Drive.  Take this to the water and make a loop around the marina area.  This is a decent place to get good looks at Brown Pelican (photos too), loons, grebes and other waterfowl. Return to Boat Basin Road via the loop around the marina.  Take a right and go a short distance to Alaska Packer Road.  This will give you a nice view of the bay and a nice sand spit that can hold gulls and shorebirds.  Return to Boat Basin Road and take it to its westerly end (Coast Guard housing).  From here, hike along the trail westward.  It will end at a fish-packing plant.  The area between the Coast Guard facility and the fish packing plant can be very birdy (This area is known as Coos Head).  Long-tailed Duck, grebes, loons, and pelicans are good here.  You might hear a Pileated Woodpecker in the woods as well.  A Magnificent Frigatebird was found here in 1987 and again in 1992.  One of Oregon's first Eurasian Collared-Doves was discovered here in 2006.  In 1984, a Northern Parula was found along the hiking trail and a Prothonotary Warbler was located in that vicinity in 1974.  Scissor-tailed Flycatcher in 2005, Vermillion Flycatcher in 1992, Summer Tanager in 1981, and Chestnut-sided Warbler in 1974 round out the rarities for this spot.    
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 B-8   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 52 - B-1    geographic coordinates 43 20’ 29” N   124 07’ 21" W
Location, Habitat and Birds: This route can be run in the daytime but the main draw here is the nighttime owling.  The best time to bird is late winter or early spring.  From the south end of Coos Bay, 101 takes a sweeping left turn and then turns south again.  Where the road turns south, go straight (east) on Newport Avenue.  This road becomes the Coos River Hwy (Hwy 241).  After the bridge, the road curves north for a while and it again curves east (this is the community of Eastside and the Millicoma Marsh).   Stay on 241 as it leaves Eastside.  Continue on until you cross the bridge at Catching Slough.  Just past the bridge, turn right on East Catching Slough Road.  Go 2.3 miles and turn left on Stock Slough Road.  Travel 2.2 miles and turn right on road #26-12-4.2.  This road is not signed but is paved for the first 4 miles.  Bird this whole paved section (there are dirt side roads to explore if you have a local map).  Listen for Saw-whet, Western Screech, N. Pygmy, and Great Horned Owls along this road.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 B-6   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 B-8     geographic coordinates 43 20’ 20” N   124 21’ 12" W
Location, Habitat and Birds: From Charleston, take the Cape Arago Hwy south for 1.5 miles and look for the turnoff to Bastendorf Beach.  Before you go down to the beach, explore the area near the entrance.  The pastures on the east side of the road can yield sparrows and Black Phoebe.  As you come to the beach, a creek empties into the ocean. This creek often has large flocks of gulls, and can have large shorebird flocks (although this beach is a popular dog beach, so birds tend not to stay here). A Curlew Sandpiper was found here on a Christmas Bird Count. Keep following the road, and take a left towards the south jetty. Park and scan the harbor from here, an excellent place to view waterfowl, loon, and grebes. A female King Eider was found here in spring. The south jetty is not a good jetty to walk out on as it is very uneven, slippery, and subject to large waves. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 B-6   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 B-8     geographic coordinates 43 19’ 49” N   124 22’ 19" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 109.  A Tropical Kingbird was here in 1983. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 B-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 B-8     geographic coordinates 43 18’ 59” N   124 23’ 05" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 110.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 B-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 B-8     geographic coordinates 43 18’ 18” N   124 23’ 38" W
Location, Habitat, and Birds   Go to the Oregon Birding Trails Website. Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 111.  A dead Brown Booby was found here on 26 October, 2008.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   33 B-6    DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 B-8     geographic coordinates 43 17’ 15” N   124 20’ 03" W
Location, Habitat, and Birds: Go to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.   Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 112.  A Hooded Warbler was found here in 1991.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 C-8     geographic coordinates   43 ’ ” N   124 ’ " W
View A Google Map              
Location, Habitat and Birds: Travel about 14 miles south of Coos Bay and turn right on W. Beaver Hill Road.  Go 1.7 miles and turn left on E. Humphries Road (this road is also called Randolph Trail Road and Whiskey Run Road).  After 2.5 miles, turn right on 7 Devils Road and go 2 miles to the park.  A dead Short-tailed Albatross was found here in 2005 and a Curlew Sandpiper was here in 1976. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-8     geographic coordinates 43 11’ 17” N   124 23’ 23" W
Location, Habitat, and Birds   Go to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 113.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-8     geographic coordinates 43 09’ 13” N   124 24’ 24" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website. Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 116.  A Yellow-billed Loon was seen here in 1989 and a Wilson's Plover spent a week here in 1998.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-8     geographic coordinates 43 09’ 27” N   124 22’ 49" W
Location, Habitat, and Birds: Go to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.   Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 114.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-8     geographic coordinates 43 07’ 51” N   124 24’ 05" W
City Information at Bandon Information.
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 117.  A Curlew Sandpiper was here in 2000.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-8     geographic coordinates 43 09’ 27” N   124 22’ 49" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 115.  Stilt Sandpiper and Bar-tailed Godwit have been found here.  
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 D-7  DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 E-10     geographic coordinates   43 03’ 53” N   124 08’ 20" W
Location, Habitat and Birds: A Broad-winged Hawk was located here in 2007 and a Vermillion Flycatcher was here in 1992. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-7   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-10     geographic coordinates   43 10’ 37” N   124 11’ 15" W
Location, Habitat and Birds:  A Ruff was found here in 1980 and a Tufted Duck was here in 1984. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 D-5    DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-8     geographic coordinates   43 07’ 08” N   124 24’ 30" W
Check out the Birding Bandon website by Steve and Susan Dimock. They run the La Kris Inn in Bandon which is a great place to stay and they are local birders and bird photographers.
Location, Habitat and BirdsOnce in Bandon, take Filmore street north to the boat basin. Look for resting shorebirds and waders at the corner of Filmore and 1st Street (near the sewer facility). Stilt Sandpiper has been recorded here. This area is also good for gulls. Drive along the marina area checking for gulls, loons, pelicans and the like. At the end of 1st Street, park in front of the old Coast Guard facility. Walk around the back and check the old dock behind the building. This is a favorite roost of "rockpipers" at high tide. Look for both Black and Ruddy Turnstones here, and in winter Rock Sandpiper. From the end of 1st Street, take South Jetty Road out to the Jetty. About a mile down this road is a sandy area with rocks and pilings. This is good at high tide for things like godwits, Willet, and Whimbrel. Just west of the first pull out is a small pond that harbors various waterfowl. A small flock of domestic geese live here, and an Emperor Goose once wintered with this group. Drive out to the end of the road and check the river mouth for water birds, and the parking lot near the jetty often has a large flock of gulls. Coming out South Jetty road, make a right and go up the hill into the neighborhood. At the top of the hill, if you go left and travel about a block or so, there is a little low spot on the south side of the road with many deciduous trees. Pish this area, as it is good for passerines. If you go right from the top of the hill, you will head west towards the bluffs overlooking the mouth of the Coquille River. The road will bend south and become Beach Loop Road. After the bend in the road, turn right onto the small side street between the motel and the large house on the north. At the end of the road is a parking area that is excellent to scan the ocean and offshore rocks. Back on Beach Loop road, go right towards Coquille Point described below. Unusual birds found in or around Bandon include King Eider in 1992, Black-vented Shearwater in 1992, Gyrfalcon in 1998, Lesser Sand-Plover in 1986, Mountain Plover in 1989, Bristle-thighed Curlew in 1981 & 1998, Hudsonian Godwit in 1978 & 1985, Bar-tailed Godwit in 1976 -77-80-87-88-90-97-99, Oregon's only Great Knot in 1990, Red-necked Stint in 1984, Little Stint in 1986, Curlew Sandpiper in 1985, Stilt Sandpiper in 1984, Ruff in 1980-89-91, White-winged Dove in 2007, Tropical Kingbird in 1979-97, Prairie Warbler in 1989, Clay-colored Sparrow in 1985, and Lark Bunting in 2002.   For other adventures around Bandon, check out the site guides for Coquille River/South Jetty, Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge/Ni-les’tun Unit, Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge/Riverside Drive, Coquille River Valley, Coquille Point, and Face Rock Wayside.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-8     geographic coordinates 43 07’ 20” N   124 25’ 40" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 118.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-8     geographic coordinates 43 06’ 50” N   124 26’ 12" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 119.   From downtown Bandon, take Hwy 101 south.  Turn right on 11th Street.  Take this street to its end (it goes around some baseball diamonds but just stay the course) and park in the parking area.  Access the beach and check out the rocks for Harlequin Duck, Rock Sandpiper, and Tufted Puffin.  Gulls, Cormorants, alcids, and gulls can be scoped from here as well.  Chestnut-sided Warbler was found in this area in 1974. 
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-7     geographic coordinates 43 06’ 28” N   124 25’ 59" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGo to the Oregon Birding Trails Website.  Choose the Oregon Coast Birding Trail.  Click on the South Coast tab and go to section 120.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 C-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 D-7     geographic coordinates 43 04’ 21” N   124 26’ 06" W
Location, Habitat, and BirdsGoing south on Beach Loop Road, continue south past Seabird Lane, and then past the parking lot for Devil's Kitchen, Bandon State Natural Area.  About 1/4-1/2 mile further south, there will be a pond on the
east side of Beach Loop Road.  You can park along the road or in the picnic area parking lot on the west side of the road.  Bird the edge of the pond and the cattail marsh at the south end of the pond.  This pond often has some common dabbler ducks, Hooded Mergansers, Pied-billed Grebe, and rails in the cattails.  Passerines and swallows are common around the edge and over the pond.  A Nashville Warbler was found here on a Christmas Bird Count.  Near the south end of the pond, on the west
side of the road, is the last access to Bandon State Natural Area, called China Creek.  Drive into this area and the parking lot will be on a small bluff above the beach.  China Creek empties into the ocean just below the parking lot, creating a meandering stream bed on the beach and in the summer often a pool or pond.  This area is very good for shorebirds.  In the spring, during late April and early May, this parking lot and beach area are excellent places to watch huge flocks of
migrating shorebirds flying north and often pausing at the mouth of the creek on the beach to feed.  As many as well over 100,000 shorebirds have been counted passing this location on a single day or morning.  This area is also good for odd shorebirds including Ruff, Long-billed Curlew, Willet, and Red Knot, as well as Whimbrels which are often common here.  A Least Tern was once found at this location.  Importantly however, this is the most easily accessible location in Coos County for Snowy Plovers.  The plovers are residents at this beach and can be found on any day at any time of the year.  The plovers nest from just below the parking lot south for many miles.  They generally roost around the China Creek area and up to a mile or more south of the parking lot.  During the non-breeding season, you will need to cross the creek (often shallow but in winter boots or no shoes may be necessary).  Walk south along the beach watching the wrackline carefully, as the plovers will roost in small to large flocks amongst the tidal debris or in depressions left in the sand.  If you do not see plovers within a 1/4 mile of the parking lot, keep walking south.  About 1.5 miles south there is a large habitat restoration area for nesting plovers, and often the plovers will be around this area or actually on the restoration area.  During the breeding season the entire beach south of China Creek is plover nesting habitat and is signed, roped and monitored.  Please stay away from the nesting area, as nests can be anywhere on the beach.  Plover beach restrictions are seriously enforced at this location, and all birders must pay attention to the signs, ropes, and monitors who watch and work on the beach.  DO NOT DISTURB the plovers!  During the non-breeding season the beach is open including the habitat restoration area, so you are permitted to walk on any area, but again, please do not overly harass or disturb the plovers, which are a protected species.  Also, this beach has very strict dog regulations, so it is best to leave your dog at home or in the car, as this is not a dog beach and more severe dog restrictions are being implemented over time.  If you have a lot of time and energy, you can walk the entire 2 miles south to the mouth of New River.  On the south side of the mouth of New River, there is a very large open sandy spit.  This is also prime plover nesting area.  Again, please be aware of all signs and ropes in the area, as during the breeding season this area is generally closed off to the public.  However, you are permitted to walk the beach and the river side.  The river side has enormous sand flats that attract many thousands of shorebirds in spring and fall.  Just downriver from the mouth is where Oregon's first documented White-rumped Sandpiper was found, and this area has had many other very interesting shorebirds just as Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, as well as many waterfowl and various other species.  This area is very remote and difficult to access, and takes many hours to walk.  To the north of China Creek are many rocky outcrops in the water and along the beach, and you should easily find Black Oystercatcher and "rockpipers" in the area.
Bradley Lake  return to the top
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 33 D-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 E-8     geographic coordinates 43 03’ 59” N   124 25’ 45" W
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Location, Habitat and Birds: Go south of Bandon about 3.5 miles and turn right on Bradley Lake Lane.  This lake is good for ducks and herons.
DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 25 A-5   DeLorme (copyright 2008)  Pg 51 F-7     geographic coordinates   42 59’ 47” N   124 27’ 22" W
Location, Habitat and Birds:   Travel south of Bandon on Hwy 101 for about 8 miles.  About 200 ft. past Milepost 283, turn west on Croft Road.  Go about 1.6 miles where the road will turn sharply to the left and the pavement ends.  Just before the curve, go straight on a dirt road.  Take this road for 0.4 miles to the host site (sometimes this location is closed to motor vehicles so be prepared to walk from here).  From the host site, go left and continue to a "T" in the road.  Turn right and you will shortly find a parking area and a trail to the river.  The river mouth is about 2 miles from here but there will be good birding all along the way.  Common birds you might see here include ducks, grebes, osprey, Peregrine Falcon, shorebirds, Anna's Hummingbird, Pacific-slope Flycatcher, Hutton's Vireo, Violet-green Swallow, Chestnut-backed Chickadee, Bewick's Wren, Wrentit, and Golden-crowned Sparrow.  There was a Bristle-thighed Curlew here in 1998.