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Deschutes County Oregon

Authors/Editors:  Tom Crabtree, Chuck Gates
County Seat: Bend
County Size: 688 square miles
High Elevation :  South Sister (10,358 ft)
Rarities : Brant, Tufted Duck, Cattle Egret, Gyrfalcon, Common Moorhen, Hudsonian Godwit, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Northern Hawk-Owl, Least Flycatcher, Eastern Phoebe, Vermillion Flycatcher, Philadelphia Vireo, Brown Thrasher, Red-throated Pipit, Phainopepla, Blue-winged Warbler, Golden-winged Warbler, Magnolia Warbler, Blackburnian Warbler, Blackpoll Warbler, Ovenbird, Mourning Warbler, Painted Redstart, Summer Tanager, Chestnut-collared Longspur, Hooded Oriole, Pine Grosbeak, White-winged Crossbill
Top County Lister : Tom Crabtree (321)
Year List Record : Lew Rems (264)  2013
County Contact Person: emailTom Crabtree 

Checklists   Full checklists contain all birds seen in the county.  The brief checklists have all rarities removed and have a larger font to make them easier to use in the field.  To help us better understand bird distribution in the state, report any bird not on the checklists.  Of special interest are birds marked with  (C) or  (S)  on the full checklist.  You can contact the person listed above or report your sightings to birdnotes.net.

 

 

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Introduction - Deschutes County, at 3,055 square miles, is larger than Delaware or Rhode Island.  It has the widest diversity of habitats and, therefore, the widest diversity of bird life in Central Oregon. Forests to the west and deserts to the east dominate the landscape. Most of the county is in the high desert with an elevation of around 4000' above sea level.  It ranges from over 10,000' on South Sister to slightly below 2,000' at Lower Bridge.  The Deschutes River runs through the entire county from north to south providing a migration highway and riparian domicile for migrants and resident birds. Geographic wonders like Smith Rock and Horse Ridge abound and many of the best birding areas provide outstanding vistas. Deschutes County is a woodpecker wonderland. By some estimates, more species of woodpeckers exist in this county than just about any comparable sized area in the world.


Deschutes County Birding Locations

 

Birding Locations

 

Smith Rock State Park

Lower Bridge

Tetherow Crossing

Redmond Sewage Ponds

Cline Falls State Park

Barr Road

Camp Polk Meadow

Calliope Crossing

Glaze Meadow

Indian Ford

Trout Creek Swamp

GW Burn/Dry Creek

Rooster Rock Burn

Bend

Tumalo State Park

Tumalo Reservoir

Shevlin Park

First Street Trail

Sawyer Park

Riverwalk Old Mill

Drake Park

Hatfield Lake

Pine Mountain

Pumice Springs

Millican Sage Grouse Lek

Entrada/Awbrey Hall Burn

Alfalfa

Brothers Rest Stop

Hampton Station

Virginia Meissner

Cultus Lake

Hosmer Lake

Crane Prairie

Wickiup Reservoir

South Sister

Broken Top

Mt Bachelor

Paulina Peak/Newberry Crater

 Lava Lands Visitor Center

 

Smith Rock State Park     return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 51 A-7     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 B-10    geographic coordinates: 44 21' 55" N, 121 08' 23" W

 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Smith Rock State Park

Location: Six miles north of Redmond on Highway 97 is the town of Terrebonne. From Terrebonne, turn east on B Avenue. Follow the signs for Smith Rock State Park. B Avenue becomes NE Smith Rock Way. Turn left on 17th Street which will dead end at NE Wilcox Ave.  (Lambert Road).  Turn right.  Take a left on NE Crooked River Drive (also known as Smith Rock Road and NE 25th Street) which will take you to the parking lot. There is a day use fee for parking.   A park map can be found on the Oregon State Parks website


Habitat and Birds: At this location the Crooked River cuts through an impressive gorge providing habitat for Nesting Golden Eagles, Prairie Falcons, Rock & Canyon Wrens, and White-throated Swifts.  The riparian habitat is good for migrants and sparrows in the winter.  In recent years small flocks of Gray-crowned Rosy-Finches have been seen close to the canyon walls in winter and the river is a good location to find Barrow’s Goldeneye and Dipper. 

 

Lower Bridge     return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg51 B-6     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 B-8  geographic coordinates: 44 21' 36" N, 121 17' 33" W

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Lower Bridge

Location: From Redmond, go north on Highway 97 to the town of Terrebonne. On the north edge of town (at the bottom of a hill) you will see signs for Crooked River Ranch. Turn (left) west on Lower Bridge Road. Stay on this road until you come to the Deschutes River.  There is a small parking area on the east side of the bridge.. Park in the parking area before the bridge.  There is a trail on both sides of the river. 

Habitat and Birds: The Deschutes River flows through an accessible riparian area surrounded by juniper woodland.  This is a great migrant spot and often has breeding Yellow-breasted Chat.  Be sure to check out the area of poplars by the car park.  This area is the most reliable place in Deschutes County for Black-capped Chickadees (fall and winter).  Other unusual species that have been seen here include Red-shouldered Hawk and Bewick’s Wren.  More common species include California Quail, Osprey, Northern Harrier, Golden Eagle, Vaux’s Swift, White-throated Swift, swallows, Canyon Wren, Marsh Wren, Lincoln Sparrow, Black-headed Grosbeak, Bullock’s Oriole, and Lesser Goldfinch.  The main draw here is migrating passerines.  Vireos, flycatchers, thrushes, and warblers top the bill during migration. 

Tetherow Crossing     return to the top   

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001)Pg 51 B-7     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 B-9    geographic coordinates: 44 18' 44" N, 121 14' 21" W 

 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Tetherow Crossing

Location: Tetherow Crossing is located a few miles west of Redmond. From Highway 97, turn west onto Highway 126 (follow the signs to Sisters). Go completely out of Redmond and you will dip down into a canyon that holds the Deschutes River. Take the first right after you cross the river (Cline Falls Hwy 74th Street). Make the loop on the off ramp and turn north on 74th Street. This road will soon turn to dirt and will eventually end up at Tetherow after a few miles. If dirt roads are not to your liking, an alternate route is to take Helmholtz Road (located off of Hwy 126 just west of Redmond.  Look for the Reindeer Farm.).  Take Helmhotz north for 3.5 miles and turn left on Tetherow Road.  Go about 1.5 miles to the crossing.  Tetherow Crossing is a bridge over the Deschutes River. History of Tetherow Crossing

Habitat and Birds: The Deschutes River flows through an accessible riparian area surrounded by juniper woodland.  Although Canyon Wrens, Northern Orioles and Black-headed Grosbeaks breed, this location is primarily a migrant spot, similar to Lower Bridge. 

Redmond Sewage lagoons     return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001)   Pg 51 B-7     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 B-9    geographic coordinates: 44 20' 13" N, 121 13' 18" W

 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Redmond Sewage Lagoons

Location: Heading north on Highway 97 after the new Redmond bypass joins back up with business 97, continue to head north. When you get to where O'Neil Highway goes to the right, take a left on NW Pershall Way, heading west. Go 2.1 miles on Pershall (which is a winding road and it turns into NW Coyner Ave.) At this point you will be at a red blinking traffic light at NW Northwest Way. Turn right (north) and go .7 miles. Here you will take a left on an unmarked, but well paved, road which heads west. In about a half mile you will see a big parking lot and a building on your left. Keep driving on the road, which will then make a 90 degree gradual curve to the right (north). After about 1/2 mile you will see a gravel road to the left, which leads to the pond. There is a dirt road the completely circles the pond.  Make sure you have signed the release form in the Documents section of the ECBC website.  The City of Redmond has an agreement with ECBC to allow its members to visit this location after they receive instruction and sign a disclaimer from Chuck Gates (email Mr. Gates).  

Habitat and Birds:  A large lagoon surrounded by agriculture land and juniper.  This is a key spot for shorebirds and ducks.  During spring and fall migration large numbers of sandpipers and other shorebirds pass through.  Bald Eagles and Ospreys fish for carp in the lagoons.   The surrounding juniper forest has hosted Long-eared, Northern Saw-whet and Barn Owls.  Unusual birds found here include Snow Goose, Cackling Goose, Eurasian Wigeon, Tufted Duck, Greater Scaup, Surf Scoter, White-winged Scoter, Red-breasted Merganser, Red-necked Grebe, Great Egret, Red-shouldered Hawk, Gyrfalcon, Peregrine Falcon, Black-bellied Plover, Solitary Sandpiper, Willet, Whimbrel, Marbled Godwit, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Sanderling, Ruff, Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Short-billed Dowitcher, Sabine's Gull, Franklin's Gull, Common Tern, Arctic Tern, Parasitic Jaeger, Long-tailed Jaeger, Band-tailed Pigeon, Black Swift, Black Phoebe, Northern Waterthrush, Tennessee Warbler and Kentucky Warbler.

Cline Falls State Park     return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 51 B-6     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 C-9    geographic coordinates: 44 16' 09" N, 121 15' 23" W

 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Cline Falls State Park

Location: Travel west on Highway 126 from Redmond (about 2 miles past the last light). Just before you enter the canyon created by the Deschutes River, look for the sign to Cline Falls SP. Turn left into the park.  The west side of the river can be accessed from Eagle Crest Resort off the Cline Falls Highway. 

Habitat and Birds: The Deschutes River flows through an accessible riparian area surrounded by juniper woodland.  This is another area that is good for migrants. Look for Osprey, Violet-green Swallow, Tree Swallow, N. Rough-winged Swallow, Cliff Swallow, Black-headed Grosbeak, American Dipper, Common Merganser, Western Wood-pewee, Canyon Wren, Osprey, White-throated Swift and Pacific Wren.

Barr Road(near Redmond)      return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 51 B-6     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 C-8    geographic coordinates: 44 12' 12" N, 121 19' 11" W

 

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Location: Head south on the Cline Falls Highway.  About 5 miles south of Highway 126 turn to the west on Barr Road.  This bends to the right and soon turns into a rough dirt road at the beginning of the BLM land. 

Habitat and Birds: Juniper forest and open sagebrush scrub.  All along this dirt road there are other open areas good for Sagebrush Sparrow and Lark Sparrow.  Pinyon Jay, Clark's Nutcracker, Mountain Bluebird, Mountain Chickadee, Ash Throated Flycatcher, and Gray Flycatcher are also seen throughout. 

Sisters Region  Virtually all of the areas described in this section are among the best places to find the largest selection of Woodpeckers in the United States.  These places support Northern Flickers, Red-naped Sapsuckers, Red-breasted Sapsuckers, Williamson's Sapsuckers, Downy Woodpeckers, Hairy Woodpeckers, Lewis's Woodpeckers, Black-backed Woodpeckers, American Three-toed Woodpeckers, White-headed Woodpeckers, Pileated Woodpeckers, and even a rare Acorn Woodpecker on occasion. 

 

Camp Polk Meadow     return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001)Pg B-4     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 B-6    geographic coordinates: 44 19' 34" N, 121 31' 30" W  

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Camp Polk Meadow

Location: This location is restricted to people who have taken the orientation course for Camp Polk Meadow. This course describes the boundaries of the property and how to record the bird life at CPM. Casual visitation is not allowed past the parking area.  For information on birding access to Camp Polk Meadow,  email Eva Eagle.  Take Camp Polk Road north out of Sisters (Camp Polk is called North Locust Street on the east side of Sisters). Travel several miles and look for the junction of Wilt Road and Camp Polk Road (If you continue straight north, the road you’re on will become Wilt Road, you must turn right to stay on Camp Polk Road). Travel a short distance and look for the signs on your left.  Park in the small car park area where there is an information sign. 

Habitat and Birds: This preserve managed by the Deschutes Basin Land Trust [see more info] has an improving meadow habitat with pools and surrounding riparian habitats.  Most of the species seen at Calliope Crossing can be found here in the spring and summer.  Both Virginia Rail and Sora can be seen here.  The springs run all winter which attracts many birds in the winter.  Since a bird list was started by an ECBC project in 2003 there has been an impressive variety of birds seen including local rarities.  The springs here run all year and attract many birds in the winter. For a complete bird list, visit Deschutes Basin Land Trust Website 

 

Calliope Crossing     return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 50 B-4     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 B-6    geographic coordinates: 44 21' 03" N, 121 33' 05" W 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Calliope Crossing

Location: From Sisters, travel south on North Locust St on the east end of Sisters. This road will become Camp Polk Road as it leaves Sisters. Travel several miles and look for Indian Ford Road on your left. Take Indian Ford to Pine Street (this is difficult to see, it’s just beyond milepost 2 from the junction of Camp Polk Road and Indian Ford Road). Take a left at Pine Street and park before the creek. OR head north on North Pine Street at the west end of Sisters (where the Sno Cap restaurant is located).  Take the road for 4 miles (it becomes dirt when you leave Sisters).  After you Cross Indian Ford creek, park on your right.  This road may not be passable in wet weather and is rutty.  The former route is suggested for passenger vehicles.

Habitat and Birds: This is one of the most well-known and beloved birding locations in the county.  Dense riparian habitat surrounded by ponderosa pine forest supports all three Sapsuckers, “Western” and Gray Flycatchers, Cassin’s Vireo, Western Wood-pewee, House Wren, Common Yellowthroat, Yellow Warbler, Cassin's Finch and Calliope Hummingbird.  Among uncommon birds in the area are Wild Turkey, Long-eared Owl, Northern Goshawk and an occasional American Redstart.Rare birds found here have included Costa's Hummingbird, Least Flycatcher, Eastern Phoebe, Plumbeous Vireo, Red-eyed Vireo, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Veery, Gray Catbird, Northern Waterthrush, Blue-winged Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, Magnolia Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Canada Warbler and Rose-breasted Grosbeak.  

Glaze Meadow & Gobbler's Knob     return to the top

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 50 A-3     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 42 B-5    geographic coordinates: 44 21' 35" N, 121 37' 31" W

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Glaze Meadow

Location:  Eastern Access: Turn off Highway 20 just opposite Indian Ford Campground on a Forest Service road. Immediately there is a turn off to the left (302) but ignore this and continue to the right. After 0.1 mile there is another turn off to the right but ignore this and continue on the main track. After 0.2 mile there is a major turn off to the right. Continue by vehicle on the road heading NW for another 0.7 miles and turn to the left on a major track. This will take you very quickly down to the gate (with reflectors on it) at the corner of a small butte (Gobbler's Knob) and the creek. Park here.

Western Access: Head down Cold Springs road (1012) from Highway 20 and after 0.9 miles turn right to Graham Corral. After 0.5 mile turn off to the right on 335 and this takes you onto the power line road. Keep following the power lines for 0.7 miles until you come to a major gate. Park here. Cross the gate and continue on the main track NW. 

Habitat and Birds: The surrounding forest is good for White-headed Woodpecker (especially) close to the western access point.  The small hill (Gobbler's Knob) at the eastern access point has breeding Fox Sparrow and Green-tailed Towhee.  The Black Butte Swamp has a variety of birds similar to Calliope Crossing including Swainson's Thrush and Ruffed Grouse.  Northern Goshawk is sometimes found here as well.  It is currently the only place in Deschutes County to reliably find Veery and Swainson's Thrush nest here in small numbers. To access the swamp from the eastern point of access, continue following the river around the edge of the rocky hill.  Willow, Dusky, Hammond’s, Gray and “Western” Flycatchers can be found in the different habitats. 

Indian Ford Campground     return to the top

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 50 A-3     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 42 B-5    geographic coordinates: 44 21' 24" N, 121 36' 38" W 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Indian Ford Campground

Location: Go through Sisters on Highway 20 heading to the west.  Travel 5.2 miles, turn right on Forest Service Road 11 (Green Ridge Road).  Make an immediate right into the campground. 

Habitat and Birds: Ponderosa forest and riparian habitat.  The spring attracts birds.  Sapsuckers and White headed Woodpeckers can be found in the campground with Cassin’s Finch, Red Crossbill, Northern Pygmy-Owl and flycatchers.  Rare birds found here have included Golden-winged Warbler, Tennessee Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler and Rose-breasted Grosbeak. 

 

Cold Springs Camp Ground      return to the top 

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 50 B-3     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 42 C-5    geographic coordinates: 44 18' 33" N, 121 37' 50" W

 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Cold Springs Campground

Location: Go through Sisters on Highway 20 heading west.  On the western edge of town take the McKenzie Highway (242) also heading west.  Follow this for 4.1 miles and look for the signs for the campground. 

Habitat and Birds: Ponderosa forest and riparian habitat.  The springs attract a variety of birds.  Williamson's and Red-naped Sapsucker abound.  White-headed Woodpecker nest in the campground, while Cassin's Finch, Red Crossbill, Northern Pygmy-Owls, Tree Swallow, Pygmy Nuthatch, Mountain Chickadee and several species of flycatchers can be found nesting in the aspens.  In the drier areas above the campground Common Poorwill can be heard calling in the summer months.

Trout Creek Swamp       return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 50 B-3     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 42 C-5    geographic coordinates: 44 14' 46" N, 121 41' 31" W

 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Trout Creek Swamp

 

Location: Go through Sisters on Highway 20 heading west.  On the western edge of town take the McKenzie Highway (242) also heading west.  A few miles west of town (past Cold Springs) turn to the left on Forest Service Rd 1018 (marked to Whispering Pine and also sometimes known as Trout Creek Butte Road).  After a few hundred yards fork to the left and continue up a gravel road for several miles.  The meadow will be seen on the left. 

Habitat and Birds: You will pass through manzanita scrub and burned/unburned pine forest on the way to the swamp.  This is a good place to see Fox Sparrow, Lazuli Bunting, Green Tailed Towhee, Sooty Grouse and Mountain Quail.  This area recently burned (2006) and should be checked for woodpeckers.  At the northern end of the swamp there is a culvert where the river leaves the swamp and this is a good area for Hammond’s Flycatcher, Hermit Warbler, Lincoln Sparrow, Pileated Woodpecker, Willow Flycatcher and Ruffed Grouse. 

GW Burn/ Dry Creek       return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 50 B-3     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 42 B-4    geographic coordinates: 44 21' 07" N, 121 44' 13" W

 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for GW Burn

 

Location: From Sisters, go almost exactly 10 miles west on Hwy 20.  At the junction that takes you to Camp Sherman, turn left (right gets you to Camp Sherman) on FR 2060 (called Geo MaCallister Rd. on Google Maps).  Go 0.4 miles and turn right on FR 2061.  Go 3.8 miles and turn left on FR 1014.  Go 0.25 miles and park.  Bird this area for woodpeckers and forest species.  There is a swamp below the road that can be very birdy.  Return to FR 2061 and continue south for about 0.8 miles and turn right on FR 1028.  You will soon cross a small creek.  Look for the 300 road (called the Old Santiam Wagon Road in Google Maps) and turn left.  Take this road for about a half mile and bird the creek edges.  Return to FR 1028 and turn right (back toward FR 2061).  Go a short distance and park.  Bird the other side of the creek from this location.  Continue on 1028 in a SE direction for a short distance past the junction with 2061.  When you reach an area with burns on both sides, you have found Dry Creek.  Bird this burned area.  Continue SE on 1028 for about 3.5 miles to Hwy 242.  Take a left to return to Sisters (Cold Springs CG is on the way).       

Habitat and Birds:  The GW Burn occurred in the fall of 2007 and has been a terrific woodpecker location since.  It is not uncommon to find Black-backed, Three-toed, White-headed, Pileated, and Hairy Woodpecker at this location.  Both Red-naped and Red-breasted Sapsuckers are common (hybrids are common in this location so check your field marks).  Williamson's Sapsucker and Lewis's Woodpeckers can be found here as well.  Other forest species include Olive-sided Flycatcher, Lazuli Bunting, Pacific-slope Flycatcher, Red Crossbill, Warbling Vireo, Cassin's Vireo, Vaux's Swift, Common Nighthawk, MacGillivray's Warbler and many more.  

Rooster Rock Burn       return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 50 B-4     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 D-6    geographic coordinates: 44 12' 55" N, 121 35' 07" W

 

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Rooster Rock Fire Map

eBird Hotspot Checklists for Rooster Rock Burn

 

Location: From Sisters, travel south on Elm Street and leave the city.  This road will become 3 Creeks Road or Forest Road 16.  Go about 5 miles south of Sisters and you will see where the burn crossed 3 Creeks Road.  When you get to burned trees, look for a wooden fence on the left.  Just past (south of) the wooden fence is an unmarked Forest Service Road.  Turn left (east) here.  Travel a couple of miles to a “T” and the burn starts here.  Turn right (east) at the “T” and enter the burn.  The road will dip into a gully.  This is a good place to start.  Just after the gully, the road splits.  Both left and right are good and you should cover both if you have time.  Take the left fork first and periodically stop to check for woodpeckers for a couple of miles until you hit live trees.  Then back-track and take the right fork and do the same.         

Habitat and Birds:   The 1634 acre Rooster Rock fire occurred in August of 2010 and has been a terrific woodpecker location since.  This is a very special location in that it has regularly produced Black-backed Woodpecker.  Other woodpeckers here include Downy, Hairy, and Williamson's Sapsucker.    In late summer and fall, this burn fills with juvenile Chipping Sparrows, bluebirds, nuthatches, and Pine Siskins.

 

 

Bend Region  

 

Bend      return to the top

DeLorme (copyright 2001)Pg 51 D-6     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 E-8    geographic coordinates: 44 03' 37" N, 121 18' 45" W 

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Bend City Information 

 

Bend Area Maps

 
Location:   Located 120 miles SE of Portland on Highway 97, Bend is the largest city in Central Oregon.  Manicured neighborhoods with ornamental fruiting trees provide a lot of habitat for permanent residents, migrants, and winter visitors.  There are several parks in the area that are popular with birders (they are listed below). 

 

Habitat and Birds: The Deschutes River flows through an accessible riparian area surrounded by juniper woodland to the east and pine forest to the west.   Pinyon Jays are scattered throughout the eastern regions of the city and Western Bluebirds are abundant.  Seasonal favorites include Varied Thrush (spring & fall), Red Crossbill (winter is best), Cassin's Finch (spring and fall), Evening Grosbeak (winter is best), and the occasional winter Bohemian Waxwing.

 

Tumalo State Park      return to the top

DeLorme (copyright 2001)Pg 51 C-6     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 E-8    geographic coordinates: 44 07' 44" N, 121 19' 52" W 

 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Tumalo State Park

 

Location: Travel west out of Bend on Highway 20 toward Sisters. Near the town of Tumalo, take a left on OB Riley Road Go 1 mile to the River Crossing and the entrance to the park.  There is a day use fee for parking.  

Habitat and Birds: The Deschutes River flows through an accessible riparian area surrounded by juniper woodland.   This area is a great migrant spot for song birds.  Regular birds here include California Quail, Osprey, Bald Eagle, Mourning Dove, Great Horned Owl, Northern Pygmy-owl, Belted Kingfisher, Downy Woodpecker, Hairy Woodpecker, Northern Flicker, Western Wood-pewee, Dusky Flycatcher, Hammond's Flycatcher, Gray Flycatcher, Warbling Vireo, assorted swallows, Mountain Chickadee, Pygmy Nuthatch, House Wren, Pacific Wren, American Dipper, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Townsend's Solitaire, Hermit Thrush, Cedar Waxwing, assorted migrating warblers, Lincoln's Sparrow and Evening Grosbeak.  Rarities that have been seen here include Green Heron, Common Tern, Barred Owl, Costa's Hummingbird, Least Flycatcher, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Gray Catbird, Northern Mockingbird, Bohemian Waxwing, Black-and-White Warbler, Tennessee Warbler, American Redstart, Black-throated Sparrow and Painted Bunting.

Tumalo Reservoir     return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 51 C-5     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 D-7    geographic coordinates: 44 08' 22" N, 121 24' 58" W

 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Tumalo Reservoir

 

Location: From Bend, travel east on Highway 20 heading toward Sisters. After a few miles, you will go down a hill and go near the tiny town of Tumalo. On your left (south) look for Bailey Road.  Take a left on Bailey Road. This road will wind around as it climbs out of the canyon. When it straightens out, it becomes Tumalo Reservoir Road. Take this road until it ends. Cross the bridge at the end and enter a dirt road area. Soon you will see places to park and access the reservoir.  There is no access off the main road. 

Habitat and Birds:  This is a small reservoir surrounded by juniper, sagebrush and ponderosa forest.  Often the reservoir dries up revealing extensive mud banks good for migrating shorebirds.  The surrounding area is good for Mountain Bluebirds and sparrows.   Common birds here include an assortment of ducks and geese, a variety of grebes, a good mix of shorebirds and waders in season, one of the most diverse populations of gulls and terns in Central Oregon and plenty of neotropic migrants in spring and fall.  Rarities reported from this location include Red-breasted Merganser, Red-necked Grebe, Clark's Grebe, Great Egret, maybe the best location in Central Oregon for Red-shouldered Hawk, Willet, Sanderling, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Stilt Sandpiper, Sabine's Gull, Mew Gull, Glaucous-winged Gull, Common Tern, Arctic Tern, Long-tailed Jaeger, Blue Jay, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Gray Catbird, Black-and-White Warbler and Rose-breasted Grosbeak.    

Shevlin Park (Bend)      return to the top

DeLorme (copyright 2001)Pg 51 D-6     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 E-8    geographic coordinates: 44 04' 59" N, 121 22' 39" W 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Shevlin Park

Location: From 3rd Street in Bend, go west on Greenwood. Greenwood changes to Newport Blvd. and then Shevlin Road.  Go down into the canyon and turn left into the parking area. About 5 miles from 3rd Street. 

Habitat and Birds: This mixed forest holds a good variety of the common species including Sharp-shinned Hawk, Great Horned Owl, Northern Pygmy-Owl, Vaux's Swift, hummingbirds, sapsuckers, Lewis’s Woodpecker, flycatchers, swallows, nuthatches, kinglets, assorted warblers, Western Tanager, Black-headed Grosbeak and Brown=headed Cowbird.  The rare bird list for this location includes Sooty Grouse, Peregrine Falcon, Band-tailed Pigeon, Costa's Hummingbird, Gray Catbird, Black-and-White Warbler and Rose-breasted Grosbeak.

First Street River Trail (Bend)      return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 51 D-6     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 E-8    geographic coordinates: 44 04' 04" N, 121 1' 48" W

 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for First Street River Trail


Location: In Bend, head west on Portland Avenue, cross the Deschutes River next to Pioneer Park and turn to the right (north) on First Street.  Park at the end of the road and walk along the river trail. 

Habitat and Birds:  Riparian woodland along the banks of the Deschutes River.  Rufous Hummingbirds are common in the spring and the area is good for migrants.  The river often may have feral Trumpeter and Mute Swans along with naturally occurring American Dipper. This is a favorite location for locals and it's always birdy.  Winter birding will produce a good mix of sparrows and both White-throated and Harris’s Sparrows have been found here. Common birds here include a good assortment of waterfowl, Osprey, Mourning Dove, Anna's Hummingbird, Belted Kingfisher, migrant flycatchers, Steller's Jay, Western Scrub-jay, swallows, Pacific Wren, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Western Bluebird, Townsend's Solitaire, migrant warblers, wintering sparrows and finches.  Rare birds reported from here include Wild Turkey, Green Heron, Peregrine Falcon, Black Phoebe and Common Redpoll.

Robert W. Sawyer State Park(Bend)      return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 51 D-6     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 E-8    geographic coordinates: 44 05' 11" N, 121 18' 39" W

 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Robert W. Sawyer State Park

Location: Known to locals as "Sawyer Park."  In Bend, the park is located off O. B. Riley Road  There is a small car park next to the river.  Cross the footbridge and follow the many trails. You can go to the left or right.  Left is more riparian brush whereas right will expose you to more open land and pines.

Habitat and Birds:  Riparian woodland along the banks of the Deschutes River.  Pygmy Nuthatch, Anna’s Hummingbird, Wood Duck, Pinyon Jay, Canyon Wren and American Dipper can be found in this interesting park.  It is also an excellent place for migrants.  See the bird list for "First Street River Trail" above.  Most of the same birds can be found here.  The two areas are next to each other. 

River Walk from The Old Mill     return to the top    

DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 -    geographic coordinates: 44 02' 38" N, 121 19' 01" W  

 

Location:Old Mill Website   

eBird Hotspot Checklists for the River Walk from The Old Mill

 

Habitat and Birds:  The Deschutes River winds through this urban center and is lined with paved paths and green areas.  Waterfowl are present year round and often produce rarities like Red-breasted Merganser, Ross's Goose, Greater Scaup, and Red-necked Grebe.  Hooded Mergansers and Barrow's Goldeneye are common.  Gulls and the occasional raptor also will make periodic appearances.  Unusual birds that have appeared here include Cackling Goose, Snow Goose, Red-breasted Merganser, Red-necked Grebe, Peregrine Falcon, Mew Gull, Thayer's Gull and Black Phoebe.

 

Drake Park     return to the top

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 51 D-6     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 -    geographic coordinates: 44 03' 32" N, 121 19' 05" W 

 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Drake Park

Location: In Bend, located one block west of downtown Bend, parking for Drake Park can be found along NW Riverside Blvd or west of the shops along the main part of downtown.

Habitat and Birds:  See the birds of the River Walk above. 

Entrada/Awbrey Hall Burn     return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 51 D-6     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 F-8    geographic coordinates: 44 01' 20" N, 121 21' 46" W

 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Entrada/Awbrey Hall Burn

Location: From Highway 97 in Bend, take the Colorado Street Exit. Go 1.6 miles on Colorado Street to a roundabout and take Century Drive out of the roundabout. Travel a few miles until you begin to see burned trees on both sides of the road. This is the Entrada Burn. It’s very close to the Entrada Lodge so that’s why it’s called the Entrada Burn (It’s officially part of the Awbrey Hall Fire from 1990). Go past the lodge and look for side roads off to your left to access the burn. 

Habitat and Birds: Scrub interspersed with ponderosa pines.  This is a prime area for Lewis’s Woodpeckers and a site for an ECBC project looking at their nesting preferences.  This is also a fine area to find Gray Flycatcher, Cassin’s Finch, Fox Sparrow and Green Tailed Towhee. 

Hatfield Lake (Bend Sewage Ponds)      return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 51 D-7     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 E-9    geographic coordinates: 44 07' 09" N, 121 12' 17" W  

 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Hatfield Lake

 

Location: Hatfield Lake is the sewage treatment facility for the city of Bend. Access is limited to walking into the ponds. The first pond is only 0.25 miles from the front gate but the back ponds are more than a 0.5 mile hike in. The easiest way to access the ponds if you don’t know Bend very well is to head east out of Bend on Highway 20. A few miles past the urban sprawl, you will see the signs for Prineville. This is the Powell Butte Highway. Take the Powell Butte Highway north for several miles until you pass the Bend Airport.  Continue past the airport on the Powell Butte Highway and take it as it turns first east and then back north. Just after the north turn, look for McGrath Road. Take McGrath west until it ends. Park here and enter at the gate. The first pond can be seen from the gate. The other ponds are farther to the north and cannot be seen from the gate.  For those that know Bend well, take Butler Market Road from Bend and travel east. Stay on Butler Market as it winds its way east. It will dead-end at the Powell Butte Highway (Bend Airport). Turn north on the Powell Butte Highway and take it as it turns first east and then back north. Just after the north turn, look for McGrath Road Take McGrath west until it ends.  Park here and enter at the gate. The first pond can be seen from the gate. The other ponds are farther to the north and cannot be seen from the gate. 

Habitat and Birds: Sewage lagoons surrounded by sagebrush / scrub and juniper.  This is a prime birding spot in all seasons.  Common species here include the broadest spectrum of waterfowl in Central Oregon, 15 species of diurnal raptors, Virginia Rail and Sora, more species of shorebirds than any other Central Oregon location, abundant and varied gull and tern reports, summer resident flycatchers (Western Kingbird, Ash-throated Flycatcher, Gray Flycatcher), both Loggerhead and Northern Shrike, robust Pinyon Jay population, swallows, Marsh Wren, kinglets, bluebirds, Townsend's Solitaire, American Pipit, Cedar Waxwing, migrating warblers and other neotropic migrants and abundant sparrow flocks. 

Exceptional Species: It's likely that Hatfield Lake has produced more rare bird reports than any other location in Central Oregon.  A partial list of rarities from this site would include Ross's Goose, Trumpeter Swan, Eurasian Wigeon, Tufted Duck, Greater Scaup, Surf Scoter, White-winged Scoter, Long-tailed Duck, Red-breasted Merganser, Pacific Loon, Red-necked Grebe, Green Heron, Snowy Plover, Whimbrel, Marbled Godwit, Ruddy Turnstone, Red Knot, Sanderling, White-rumped Sandpiper, Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, Stilt Sandpiper, Ruff, Red Phalarope, Sabine's Gull, Franklin's Gull, Arctic Tern, Parasitic Jaeger, Eastern Kingbird, Purple Martin, Northern Mockingbird, Chestnut-collared Longspur, Snow Bunting, Hooded Warbler, Northern Parula, Blackpoll Warbler, American Tree Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow and Bobolink.  If you have to pick one place in Deschutes County to bird, this is it.   

Eastern Region  

 

Pine Mountain     return to the top

DeLorme (copyright 2001)Pg 76 A-1     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 80 A-1    geographic coordinates: 43 37' 30" N, 120 56' 29" W 

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Location: From Bend, travel east on Highway 20 toward Burns. Just after the town of Millican (near milepost 26), look for Pine Mountain Road off to the south. This road takes you to the summit of Pine Mountain. Side roads can access the backside of the mountain. If you have time, explore these back roads. You can even access the summit from the south side on a very rocky and difficult road. 

Habitat and Birds:  Sagebrush and juniper forest in the Millican Valley rising up to pine and fir forests on the mountain.  Be sure to check out the water trough on the left side of the road at the base of the mountain, which is a magnet for birds and other wildlife.  Large flocks of Cassin's Finches, Mountain Bluebirds and Red Crossbills often stop by to drink.  Pine Mountain itself is good for raptors, Ruffed Grouse, flycatchers and Green-tailed Towhee.  The many roads that run throughout the Millican Valley are excellent for Sagebrush, Brewer’s and Vesper Sparrow as well as Sage Thrasher and Loggerhead Shrike.  In good years, Ferruginous Hawks nest here. 

Alfalfa     return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 51 D-8     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 76 F-1    geographic coordinates: 44 04' 40" N, 121 01' 37" W

 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Prineville Juniper Haven Cemetery

Location: From Bend, take Highway 20 East to the Powell Butte Highway (Prineville Cutoff), take the Powell Butte Highway 0.5 miles to Alfalfa Market Road. Turn east and follow Alfalfa Market Road to Alfalfa. Explore the side roads to the north and east of Alfalfa.  Once you leave the farmland, you will enter a juniper forest and diversity will drop off.  Stick to the farmland if you are looking for raptors.  Near the community of Alfalfa, there is an electrical station on the corner of Alfalfa Market Road and Johnson Ranch Road.  Take Johnson Ranch Road north to an area that has ranch houses and a large pond.  This pond must be viewed from the road but is productive.

Habitat and Birds:  Agricultural lands.  This is a prime area for wintering raptors such as Prairie Falcons, Red tailed and Rough Legged Hawks.  In summer search for Swainson’s and Ferruginous Hawks.  In winter, this is a good place to check Horned Lark or American Pipit flocks for Lapland Longspur.  Year-round, this area is good for Northern Harrier and Great Horned Owl.  Mountain Bluebirds are common in most months and American Robin flocks can reach into the thousands in some winters.  Johnson Ranch Pond usually hosts a good selection of ducks and grebes.  American White Pelican are often present in summer months and this pond hosts one of the largest concentrations of Common Nighthawk in late August as they stage for migration.

Pumice Springs      return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 76 A-1     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 80 B-1    geographic coordinates: 43 43' 06" N, 120 51' 38" W

 

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Location: Take Highway 20 East from Bend.  At milepost 21.5, turn South on Forest Road 23/25.   It is the second turn to the south after you cross the summit of Horse Ridge.  There is a brown sign here that says “OHV TRAIL SYSTEMS” and a green sign that says “China Hat Rd.”  Stay on FS 23/25, paved, for 5.9 miles.  At this point FS 23 turns to gravel and branches away from the pavement (the paved road becomes FS 25).  There is a sign here that says “Entering Opine Travel Management Area”.  This dirt road goes around the south side of Pine Mountain.  Stay on FS 23 for approximately 12 miles to the BPA Sand Springs substation turnoff to the north (left).  If you get to Sand Springs on FS 23, also a good desert birding spot, you have gone a little over a mile too far.  Turn on the substation road and go 100 feet or so and park next to a pumice road that goes to the North (look for a metal gate).  Pumice Springs is only a short walk.  Do not drive out on the pumice road as FS is trying to encourage re-growth of desert plants. As a recognition point, the large substation is immediately east of Pumice Springs and easily seen from FS road 23.  There are two ponds that can be spotted by looking for the fencing around each.  Walk to first (smaller) pond to view wildlife noting if there are ungulates or other animals that may be disturbed.   Please leave the area if they are using it or limit time if they are in the area waiting to drink.  If you scare them off at the larger pond, return to the smaller pond. They will usually return to drink once you leave the larger pond area.

Habitat and Birds:  Pumice flats and sage along with 2 ponds.  Birds that have been seen here in the past include Cooper's Hawk, Clark's Nutcracker, Tree Swallow, both Western and Mountain Bluebirds, Varied Thrush (migration), Black-throated Gray Warbler, Chipping Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow, and Cassin's Finch.  This is an under-visited location and could be productive during migration. 

Millican Sage Grouse Lek     return to the top

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 45 A-8     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 80 A-1    geographic coordinates: 43 52' 15" N, 120 00' 41" W 

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Location: From Bend (Greenwood and 27th St. near Costco and Bend Cinemas), take Highway 20 East for 18 miles.  You will climb a ridge (Horse Ridge) and proceed down into a valley.  At the bottom of this ridge is an unmarked DIRT road to the right (south).  This road is called County Road 2015 on Google Maps and Fort Rock Rd. on most other maps.  If you come to a paved road called China Hat Road, you’ve gone too far east by about a quarter mile.  Take this DIRT road south for 2.7 miles.  The road is basically straight.  When you come to a curve to the right, take an unmarked dirt road to the left (east).  This is called Ford Road on some maps but is not signed.  Go east for 0.4 miles and turn right on another unmarked dirt road.  Go 0.25 miles to a gate.  The birds are displaying in the open area beyond the gate.  DO NOT ENTER THE PROPERTY AS IT IS PRIVATE AND WELL POSTED.  The birds can be easily observed from within the vehicle and it is not recommended you get out of the vehicle at this location.

Habitat and Birds:  Sagebrush Steppe and open areas.  Other birds in the area include Horned Lark, Sagebrush Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow, Vesper Sparrow, Lark Sparrow, Sage Thrasher, and other sage species.

 

Brothers Rest Stop     return to the top

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 76 A-2     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 80 A-3    geographic coordinates: 43 48' 47" N, 120 35' 57" W 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Brothers Rest Area

 

Location: From Bend, take Highway 20 East and look for the Powell Butte Highway turnoff.  Don’t take this turnoff but set your odometer from this spot.  Travel on Highway 20 another 37 miles.  Check the town of Brothers.  There are some trees that can produce migrants.  The rest stop is a little east of Brothers.  Sage Thrashers and Sagebrush Sparrows are common here as are Mountain Bluebirds. Exceptional species that have been seen here include Eastern Kingbird, Mourning Warbler, Palm Warbler and Common Grackle.

Habitat and Birds:  Agricultural lands.  This is a prime area for wintering raptors such as Prairie Falcons, Red tailed and Rough Legged Hawks.  In summer search for Swainson’s and Ferruginous Hawks. The rest stop has produced some surprising migrants so check the area during the migration season.

Hampton Station     return to the top 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 76 B-4     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 80 B-5    geographic coordinates: 43 40' 26" N, 120 14' 12" W 

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Location: From Bend, take Highway 20 East and look for the Powell Butte Highway turnoff.  Don’t take this turnoff but set your odometer from this spot.  Travel on Highway 20 another 58 miles. 

Habitat and Birds:  Agricultural lands.  This is a prime area for wintering raptors such as Prairie Falcons, Red tailed and Rough Legged Hawks.  In summer search for Swainson’s and Ferruginous Hawks.  If you happen to be in this area during the fall or spring migration, check the trees around the station.  Some unusual migrants have been seen here (Chestnut-sided Warbler, Clay-colored Sparrow, Northern Mockingbird).  Long-billed Curlew and Short-eared Owl have been observed in this area as well.

High Lakes Region  

 

Virginia Meissner Snow Park     return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 45 A-4     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 43 F-6    geographic coordinates: 43 15' 05" N, 121 31' 37" W

 

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Location: From Highway 97 in Bend, take the Colorado Street Exit. Go 1.6 miles on Colorado to a Circle and take Century Drive out of the Circle. Travel 12 miles on Century Drive and look for the signs to Virginia Meissner Snow Park. 

Habitat and Birds:  High elevation forest.  This is an excellent area for owls.  In late May it is possible to hear Western Screech, Flammulated and Northern Saw-whet Owls.  In the daytime, watch for Chestnut-backed Chickadee, Gray Jay, Clark's Nutcracker, a variety of woodpeckers and, occasionally, Pine Grosbeak. 

Cultus Lake     return to the top     

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 44 B-2     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 49 B-8    geographic coordinates: 43 49' 35" N, 121 49' 59" W

 

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Location: Travel south from Bend on US 97 for approximately 14 miles. Turn right (west) on South Century Drive toward Sunriver. Follow this main road as it curves through Sunriver and becomes Spring River Road, then Forest Service Road 40. After about 20 miles, FS 40 intersects Cascade Lakes Highway/FS 46. Turn left onto FS 46 and drive 1.2 miles to FS 4635 on the right. Turn onto FS 4635 (toward Cultus Lake Resort/Cultus Lakes). You will pass the entrance road to Cultus Lake Resort after 1.7 miles on FS 4635. Continue straight past the resort (the road designation changes to FS 100). In another 0.1 mile, park in a pullout on the right (across from a day-use picnic area and beach). For a map of Cultus Lake [click].  

Habitat and Birds:  This high lake is under-birded and will likely yield typical high mountain species.  Look for Sooty Grouse, Ruffed Grouse, American Three-toed Woodpecker, Pileated Woodpecker, Gray Jay, Steller's Jay, Tree Swallow and Vaux's Swift.  Barrow's Goldeneye may nest here occasionally.

Hosmer Lake     return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 44 A-2     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 42 F-4    geographic coordinates: 43 57' 33" N, 121 47' 19" W

 

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Location: From Highway 97 in Bend, take the Colorado Street Exit. Go 1.6 miles on Colorado to a Circle and take Century Drive out of the Circle. Go 33 miles on Century Drive, past Elk Lake, and turn on Forest Road 4625. Turn left and go a little over a mile to Hosmer.  This is an excellent lake to see by boat or canoe. 

Habitat and Birds:  Cattails and open lake with surrounding high elevation forest.  Barrow's Goldeneye nest here.  Sooty and Ruffed Grouse have been located in the area.  Osprey and Bald Eagles hunt the lake.  The cattails hold rails and American Bittern in the summer.  Occasionally, Sandhill Cranes visit here and Spotted Sandpipers are regular nesters.  Olive-sided Flycatchers are common and it is possible to see Gray Jay, Varied Thrush, Chestnut Backed Chickadee and woodpeckers such as American Three-Toed Woodpecker.  Western Tanagers are common here warblers include Common Yellowthroat and Hermit. 

Crane Prairie Reservoir     return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 44 B-2     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 49 C-8    geographic coordinates: 43 48' 126" N, 121 47' 48" W

 

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eBird Hotspot Checklists for Crane Prairie Reservoir

 

Location: From downtown Bend, take the Cascade Lakes Hwy 44 miles to the Jct. of Hwy 46 and F.S. Road 40.  Cow Camp: There is a marked turnoff from F.S. Road 40 between the Cascade Lakes Hwy and the Deschutes River bridge onto F.S. Road 970.  Along this (sometimes wash-boarded) road keep a lookout for Ruffed Grouse. At the T-junction, turn left and proceed until you cross over the creek (actually the Deschutes River). Find a place to park along the road.
   A walk around the campground can produce Gray Jays, all 3 sapsuckers, nuthatches, Brown Creeper, both kinglets, and Mountain Chickadee. Search the creek from the bridge to the boat launch for American Dipper.  There is a trail from the boat launch which follows the creek out to Crane Prairie. This trail can be inaccessible in early spring because of high water.  During spring and early summer waterproof footwear is recommended.  At all times be attentive to the potholes dug by the beavers on the first part of the trail.
   The willows along the creek can contain warblers, flycatchers, and sparrows during migration.  Highlights in this area have been Chestnut-backed Chickadee, Willow Flycatcher, and Black-crowned Night-heron.  Near the mouth of the creek are sand banks which can be good for shorebirds in Aug./Sept.  The first Harlequin Duck recorded in Deschutes County was seen in this area.
    Work your way out as far as the soggy ground permits, to scope the lake for ducks, gulls, terns and cormorants. During summer Sandhill Cranes can be heard and seen. Osprey nest along the creek and edges of the lake. Highlights have been Laughing Gull, Franklin’s Gull, and Red-shouldered Hawk.
Crane Prairie Lodge: On F.S. Road 4270, between F.S.Roads 40 & 42, turn into the entrance to the lodge (well signed). In the Fall, when the lodge is closed, park by the gate and walk in. Look in the trees around the lodge to find kinglets, nuthatches, Brown Creepers, and Mountain Chickadees. From the lawn of the lodge scope the lake for ducks, gulls, terns, grebes, eagles, and loons (in fall). Occasionally, Sandhill Cranes can be seen across the lake from the lodge. Highlights here have been Long-tailed Duck and Red-breasted Merganser.

Habitat and Birds:  Lake and high elevation forest.  Cow Camp is an excellent access point where you can view the lake for ducks, shorebirds and Osprey.  The wet grasslands hold breeding Sandhill Cranes.  The surrounding forest has Winter Wrens, Gray Jays and Ruffed Grouse.

Wickiup Reservoir     return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 44 C-3     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 49 D-9    geographic coordinates: 43 42' 06" N, 121 45' 21" W

 

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Central Oregon Map

eBird Hotspot Checklists for Wickiup Reservoir

Location: From La Pine (south of Bend), turn west on Forest Road 42. Just north of the reservoir, turn to the left to Twin Lakes.  Check the North Twin Lake.  Opposite this turn off, to the west, is an access road that leads to an arm of the reservoir (Sheep Bridge) that is a good area for shore birds and Bald Eagles.  Opposite the turn off for South Twin Lake is another access point for the reservoir.  Continuing on, there is a turn off to a boat ramp on the right (Gull point).  A road continues all around the reservoir with sidetracks giving views of the water. 

Habitat and Birds: This is a very large area of open water, open bare ground, marsh and high elevation forest.  Common Loons, grebes, gulls and ducks are present in good numbers during the migration. If mud is exposed, look for shorebirds.  A wide variety of songbirds are present in the surrounding forests.  The open bare ground around the reservoir holds large flocks of American Pipits and Mountain Bluebirds in the fall and supports many American Kestrels hunting grasshoppers in July.  This is an excellent area and one that has hosted many rare and exciting birds. 

South Sister     return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 50 D-2     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 42 E-4    geographic coordinates: 44 02' 09" N, 121 45' 39" W

 

View A Google Map  Trail Map Here

 

Location:  The trailhead for this stiff 12-mile hike is at Devil’s Lake Campground off the Cascade Lake Highway which is a little more than 6 miles past the Mt. Bachelor Ski area.  View a web page about the South Sister Trail.

Habitat and Birds:  High elevation forest and alpine expanses.  The high elevation areas close to the summit are excellent for Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch.  The glacier and lake on the summit attract migrating shorebirds such as Baird’s and Western Sandpipers. 

Broken Top     return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 50 D-3 3 Creeks Lake     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 42 E-4    geographic coordinates: 44 06' 02" N, 121 37' 26" W

 

View A Google Map  Trail Map Here

Location:  Take the Todd Lake turn off from the Cascade Lakes Highway.  Go about 4 miles down FS 370 past the trailhead.  The entire road is excellent and continues to Three Creeks Lake.  A high clearance vehicle is required and 4-Wheel drive if the entire road is attempted. This is a summer birding area only.

Habitat and Birds:  High elevation forest.  Boreal Owls are heard here mostly in October before the area is closed by snow.  The 370 Rd is good for Black-backed Woodpeckers feeding on the lodge pole pines.  There is an access road to the Broken Top trail head and a possibility for Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch.

Mount Bachelor     return to the top

 

DeLorme (Copyright 2001) Pg 44 A-3     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 42 F-4    geographic coordinates: 44 00' 15" N, 121 40' 40" W

Location:      Mt. Bachelor Website 

Habitat and Birds:  This mountain ski resort keeps the roads open and free of snow year round.  Access to the high mountains may produce wintering mountain species like Gray Jay, Red Crossbill (White-winged is possible but not likely), Mountain Chickadee, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Steller's Jay.

Paulina Peak - Newberry Crater     return to the top

 

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 45 C-7      DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 50 D-4  geographic coordinates: 43 41' 20" N, 121 15' 17" W 

 

Location:       Paulina Peak-Newberry Crater Website,

                   Newberry Crater National Volcanic Monument Website   

Habitat and Birds:  If you're pressed for time and you can't go up into the high lakes area of SW Deschutes County, a quick trip to Newberry Crater might be advised.  Most of the mountain species found in Central Oregon can be located in this area.  On the way up, check the burned areas for woodpeckers.  At the top of the road, there are two lakes (Paulina and East Lakes).  These can have waterfowl but nothing like Wickiup or Crane Prairie.  The view from Paulina Peak is worth the drive up.  Take the road all the way to the top in summer.

Lava Lands Visitor Center     return to the top

DeLorme (copyright 2001) Pg 45 A-6     DeLorme (copyright 2008) Pg 50 A-3    geographic coordinates:  43 54' 35" N, 121 21' 25" W

Location:   Eight Miles south of Bend off Highway 97    Lava Lands Visitor Center Website 

Habitat and Birds:  The bird bath behind the visitor center (off the patio) is a great place to get close up views of Red Crossbill, Clark's Nutcracker, Pygmy Nuthatch, Mountain Chickadee and sparrows.  Two trails behind the visitor center are also worth a hike - look for Green-tailed Towhees on the Whispering Pines Trail, and nesting Rock Wrens on the Molten Lands Trail.  Four miles down the road is Benham Falls Picnic area which is a great place for riparian species and spring migrants.